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I recently stumbled upon this interesting concept that may save me much testing efforts. What I do not understand is how can the provider be injected in runtime?

The scenario is trivial: I am constructing a mock object at run-time with my mocking framework of choice, but I do not know the name of the generated class in advance because it is a mock (so I can't configure it in advance, not do I want to).

Did anybody make successful use of this technique in unit tests?

Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The concept described in that article is an Ambient Context that uses a Service Locator in the background.

Because of the use of a static property and the use of the Service Locator, this pattern is very inconvenient for unit testing. To be able to run a test that verifies code that uses this singleton, you need to set up a valid Service Locator and configure it with the singleton (probably a mock instance) that you care about using testing.

Even the example given by the article already suffers from these problems, since the "Do you like singletons?" code, is hard to test:

if (DialogDisplayer.getDefault().yesOrNo(
    "Do you like singletons?"
)) {
    System.err.println("OK, thank you!");
} else {
    System.err.println(
        "Visit http://singletons.apidesign.org to"
        + " change your mind!"
    );
}

A better alternative is to use constructor injection to inject that singleton (please excuse my French, but I'm not a native Java speaker):

public class AskTheUserController
{
    private DialogDisplayer dialogDisplayer;
    private MessageDisplayer messageDisplayer;

    public AskTheUserController(DialogDisplayer dialogDisplayer,
        MessageDisplayer messageDisplayer)
    {
        this.dialogDisplayer = dialogDisplayer;
        this.messageDisplayer = messageDisplayer;
    }

    public void AskTheUser()
    {
        if (this.dialogDisplayer.yesOrNo(
            "Do you like singletons?"
        )) {
            this.messageDisplayer.display("OK, thank you!");
        } else {
            this.messageDisplayer.display(
                "Visit http://singletons.apidesign.org to"
                + " change your mind!"
            );
        }
    }
}

There was another 'hidden' dependency in that code: System.err.println. It got abstracted using a MessageDisplayer interface. This code has a few clear advantages:

  • By injecting both dependencies, the consumer doesn't even need to know that those dependencies are singletons.
  • The code clearly communicates the dependencies it takes.
  • The code can easily be tested using mock objects.
  • The test code doesn't need to configure a service locator.

Your tests might look like this:

@Test
public void AskTheUser_WhenUserSaysYes_WeThankHim()
{
    // Arrange
    bool answer = true;

    MockMessageDisplayer message = new MockMessageDisplayer();
    MockDialogDisplayer dialog = new MockDialogDisplayer(answer);

    AskTheUserController controller =
        new AskTheUserController(dialog, message);

    // Act
    controller.AskTheUser();

    // Assert
    Assert.AreEqual("OK, thank you!", message.displayedMessage);
}

@Test
public void AskTheUser_WhenUserSaysNo_WeLetHimChangeHisMind()
{
    // Arrange
    bool answer = true;

    MockMessageDisplayer message = new MockMessageDisplayer();
    MockDialogDisplayer dialog = new MockDialogDisplayer(answer);

    AskTheUserController controller =
        new AskTheUserController(dialog, message);

    // Act
    controller.AskTheUser();

    // Assert
    Assert.IsTrue(
        message.displayedMessage.contains("change your mind"));
}

Your test code will never be as intend revealing as the code above when you're using the 'injectable singleton' pattern as shown in the article.

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Thank you for the answer. However, I am not a purist and I don't mind that certain dependencies are implicit. + 1 for the elaboration. It seems I will define overridable getter properties and use them to inject mocks during testing. This is the least invasive way for now. –  Vitaliy Aug 13 '12 at 14:08
    
I am by no means a purist. I'm very practical, but I found out the hard way that singletons are a PITA, even the 'injectable singleton' model, as described by that article. I like my code and tests to be simple and maintainable, and the singleton pattern is often in the way of achieving that. –  Steven Aug 13 '12 at 15:19

There is nothing wrong with singletons, which are useful and necessary concepts in any software. The problem is that you shouldn't implement them with static fields and methods.

I use Guice to inject my singletons and I haven't had to use static in my code base and tests in a very long time.

Here are a couple of links you might find useful that explain how to achieve testable singletons with Guice:

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