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How do I get last year's date in C#?

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Can you explain further what you are trying to achieve? Otherwise you'll get the answer DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1); –  Lazarus Jul 28 '09 at 11:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

What do you mean by "Last years date"?

Today, one year ago would be

DateTime lastYear = DateTime.Today.AddYears(-1);

is this what you're looking for?

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Exactly, thanks :) –  JL. Jul 28 '09 at 11:23
    
+1 for being so quick off the mark! –  AdaTheDev Jul 28 '09 at 11:27
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FYI, This takes into account leap year: If the current instance represents the leap day in a leap year, the return value depends on the target date: If value + DateTime.Year is also a leap year, the return value represents the leap day in that year. For example, if four years is added to February 29, 2012, the date returned is February 29, 2016. If value + DateTime.Year is not a leap year, the return value represents the day before the leap day in that year. For example, if one year is added to February 29, 2012, the date returned is February 28, 2013. –  cdwaddell Apr 24 at 13:48

using Fluent DateTime http://fluentdatetime.codeplex.com/

var oneYearAgo = 1.Years().Ago();
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+1 At least this is different. Hopefully someone (@JonSkeet) will talk through the various ways of doing it in Noda Time! –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 14 '12 at 20:48
DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1);
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-1 Duplicate of earlier accepted answer –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 14 '12 at 20:47

What do you mean by "last years date"?

If you just want the date of today minus one year, try the following:

    DateTime myDateTime = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1);

I hope that is what you need.

UPDATE: Damn, I'm way to slow it seems :(

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-1 Duplicate of earlier accepted answer –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 14 '12 at 20:47
DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1)
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@RubenBartelink - this really deserved a downvote?! My answer was posted 25 seconds after the accepted, which wasn't there when I started answering. Debatably, this answer could be removed, but a downvote doesn't seem in very good spirit IMHO. –  AdaTheDev Nov 14 '12 at 21:02
    
2 others have already deleted their duplicates (before any downvoting) including one 18s newer and one later. The objective of the downvote is two fold a) encourage you to strongly consider deleting b) move junk to the bottom –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 14 '12 at 23:39
    
It would be nice if even one of the answers explained whether it takes 365 days or handles leap years or said something different to any of the other 'answers'. And there is a comment that can be upvoted too - or you and the others can go upvote an answer that's a) different b) also useful like I did. FWIW I didnt upvote the accepted answer as a) I dont think its sufficiently thorough b) the comment is the most appropriate response. Should I upvote your answer? How about the other 1 from before you and the one after you? I'm not singling anyone out and stand by my vote –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 14 '12 at 23:54
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@RubenBartelink - You are of course entitled to your opinion. I personally believe in downvoting wrong/misleading answers (which these weren't) and also maybe if someone blatantly copied the same thing a long time after the original, again which these weren't. Hey ho, life goes on. –  AdaTheDev Nov 15 '12 at 9:27
    
Not a problem - there's lots of ways of looking at it. Personally when I end up in this situation (duplicate, later and not better than 'the winner', I either make it different by changing the angle or I delete - but I'm clearly a bit of a tidy freak and don't expect everyone to do that... Counterpoint: Should @Jon B and malach undelete to join the party? (Another example of such a debate: stackoverflow.com/a/1825684/11635 - I think it was a relevant response but some people prefer copy-pasted content to links) –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 15 '12 at 10:06

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