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This is an efficiency question related to LocationManager (and more generally to managing memory vs. CPU usage in Android). Let's say I have a long-running service that wants to use the getLastKnownLocation method of LocationManager every 60 seconds in order to update the location. This service uses a TimerTask and a Time with repeated fixed-delay execution. Is it better to create an instance field mLocationManager and keep it around for the life of the service, or is it better to instantiate LocationManager on each execution of the TimerTask, where supposedly the VM will only keep it around while it is needed? In code:

public class ProximityService extends Service {

    private LocationManager mLocationManager;

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        mLocationManager = (LocationManager) getSystemService(Context.LOCATION_SERVICE);
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        TimerTask mGetLastKnownLocationTask = new GetLastKnownLocationTask();
        timer.schedule(mGetLastKnownLocationTask, 0, 60000);
    }

    private class GetLastKnownLocationTask extends TimerTask {

       public void run() {
           Location mLocation = 
               mLocationManager.getLastKnownLocation(LocationManager.GPS_PROVIDER);
               // Do something with mLocation
       }
    }
...
}

vs.

...

@Override
public void onCreate() {
    Timer timer = new Timer();
    TimerTask mGetLastKnownLocationTask = new GetLastKnownLocationTask();
    timer.schedule(mGetLastKnownLocationTask, 0, 60000);
}

private class GetLastKnownLocationTask extends TimerTask {

   public void run() {
       LocationManager mLocationManager = (LocationManager) getSystemService(Context.LOCATION_SERVICE);
       Location mLocation = 
           mLocationManager.getLastKnownLocation(LocationManager.GPS_PROVIDER);
           // Do something with mLocation
   }
}

Note: I do not require a LocationListener to keep GPS active. That is handled in another part of the application with a separate service. Here I only want to check the most recent known location at a fixed interval.

share|improve this question

Wouldn't it be better to get the location manager once, and then register a passive location listener? Having to call getLastKnownLocation() is supposed to be a quick solution for when you do not have time to gain a valid location fix, not necessarily for repetitive use.

Like...

    LocationManager lm = (LocationManager)  getSystemService(Context.LOCATION_SERVICE);
    //change best provider to a passive location service.
    String bestProvider = lm.getBestProvider(new Criteria(), true);
    if(bestProvider!=null){
       lm.requestLocationUpdates(bestProvider, 1000 * 60 * 15 ,5000, 
       new LocationListener {

        public void onLocationChanged(Location location) {

        }

        public void onProviderDisabled(String provider) {}

        public void onProviderEnabled(String provider) {}

        public void onStatusChanged(String provider, int status, Bundle extras) {}
        }
        );

    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, but there are several reasons I am using getLastKnownLocation() instead of a LocationListener. The first is that I want to ensure that my update fires off, regardless of whether GPS is available or not. For example, if the user has been indoors for awhile, then I assume the best location for him/her is that obtained with getLastKnownLocation(). Is there any technical reason why getLastKnownLocation() should not be used in a repetitive manner, or is it just your impression that it was not intended to be used in this way? – robguinness Aug 14 '12 at 7:23

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