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Here is a skeleton code:

class C{
  callMe(){}
};

class A{
  // How to use callMe()
};

class B : C {
  callMe();
  A a;
};

In this example class B extends class C, so it can call callMe() method. But I need to use callMe() using class A given that class A can not extend class C. I wonder how?

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5  
Well, this is far from C++ code. And even more far from C. –  Kiril Kirov Aug 13 '12 at 13:55
1  
Can you make the function public? If not, you can use friend. C also doesn't have classes in the sense that you can inherit from them without some extra work. –  chris Aug 13 '12 at 13:55
    
I just put a skeleton... –  Mr. Flint Aug 13 '12 at 13:55
1  
You are missing a return type on callMe();. If B extends C you don't need to redeclare callMe(); either. Lastly, you will need to have an instance of C inside A to call the callMe(); method of that instance AND declare it in C as public OR declare A as a friend of C (Since callMe(); is not static nor public by default). Are you familiar with concepts of Object Oriented Programmation ? –  Eregrith Aug 13 '12 at 13:57
    
Redesign you object model ... Or don't use Object Oriented design if you don't use it as its meant to be –  Michael Laffargue Aug 13 '12 at 13:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you need to make A contain an object of type C.

class A
{
 private:
   C objC;

 public:
   void WhateverMethod() { objC.CallMe(); }

};

Also, the syntax for inheritance is

class B : C{

};

If you want B to simply have access to CallMe(), then you do not need to redefine it in B. It will inherit it from C. If you want B to override CallMe then you need to do this:

class C
{
  public:
    virtual void CallMe() { //definition }

};

class B : public C
{
 public:
   void CallMe() { //redefine it here }

};

Note, I assume from your syntax errors that you are a JAVA programmer. Methods are not automatically marked as virtual in C++, you have to mark them as virtual if you want to use polymorphism, and you have to use them from a pointer for it to work.

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class C{ 
  callMe(){} 
friend class A;
}; 


class A{

//use call me here

};
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You need to provide an instance of C:

class C {
public: // has to be public
  void callMe() const {}
};

class A{
public:
    A(const C& inst) : inst(inst) {}

    void foo() {
        inst.callMe();
    }
private:
    const C& inst;
};
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2  
That will not compile, unless you make callMe const member function, or alternatively, save inst as non-const reference. –  Nawaz Aug 13 '12 at 13:59

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