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Having the following code:

function test(x) {
   if(x=='a') return false;
   return true;
}

if(y ==x) {
    return test('a');
    group['ids']= inputs.val();
    console.log(group);
}

why return true simply breaks my code by not continuing beyond the return?

Note: I want the return test()'s answer to control if either it should continue with the code OR not

Update

I already do something like:

var response = test('b');
if (response==false) return false;
... more code here ...

But I want to avoid having to do so on every invoke of that function

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6  
because that's what return does. –  Andy Aug 13 '12 at 13:57
    
what do you mean breaks your code? "return true" at that line will mean it won't continue to the rest of that code. –  jjay225 Aug 13 '12 at 13:57
    
The return statement gives the value to return from the function. Execution of the function should stop at that point so I'm not sure what the problem is. How does your code break exactly? –  Malice Aug 13 '12 at 13:59
    
btw this is not syntax error, return statement immediately return to control/ flow of the function to the calling module. as per the programming language concept, it's behaving correctly.. you have to refactor you code to achieve your desired output. –  Niranjan Kala Aug 13 '12 at 13:59
    
I think there is a misunderstanding regarding who does the return of the value it's not "return test()" that gives you the value it's "test()", return always exists the current function and returns the value supplied –  Liviu T. Aug 13 '12 at 14:09

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because that's what return does in almost every programming language: it

  1. exits the function and
  2. returns a value

If you need other code to be executed, put it before the return statement.

Edit: I saw your edit, but it doesn't change the very nature of return in that (and every) context. It will continue to stop the flow of the current scope, returning to the nearest higher scope with a value (in your case, true or false).

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3  
Downvoters please explain. –  Cranio Aug 13 '12 at 13:59

The keyword return, as it name suggests, returns the program flow control to the calling function and optionally sets the function's return value.

This works the same way in every C-like language.

What you probably wanted to do is a Delphi-like approach, where the keyword Result works differently - it just sets the return value that will be used when the function terminates, but does not immediately terminate the function.

function() {
  var result = someDefaultValue;

  if (someCondition)
    result = otherValue;

  if (otherCondition)
    result = yetAnotherValue;

  return result;
}
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When a return statement executes, the execution of the current function ends, and control of the program is returned to the context that invoked the function. Anything after a return statement will not be executed.

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Ok, I understand now... but this is going to make a mess of my code :D –  w0rldart Aug 13 '12 at 14:04
    
how is this going to make a mess of your code? While the language syntax allows you to do what you are doing, it's in effect an error to do it. It makes absolutely no sense to have any statements after a return. Your code is massively broken. –  hvgotcodes Aug 13 '12 at 14:08
    
@w0rldart - you can still write clean code within these conditions, your code is currently a mess because you have written function test(x) { if(x=='a') { return false; } return true; } instead of function test(x) { return x !== 'a'; } –  Steve Fenton Aug 13 '12 at 14:08

The return keyword causes a function to end ('return') when the interpreter reaches that keyword and does not continue to process anything after the return statement (in that same function).

You could rewrite what you have:

group['ids']= inputs.val();
console.log(group);
return true;
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try putting return at the end because return true will break the execution and nothing will execute after that

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what is not useful in this answer –  rahul Aug 13 '12 at 14:00

I typically find out which scenarios are bad/errors and return false; out of them, THEN continue on to the code which is correct.

function Testmcdooder (test) {
    if (test === false) {
        // just exit up here
        return false;            
    }

    // now all of this code will run only if we're fine
    group['ids']= inputs.val();
    console.log(group);
}
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The return statement exists from the function. I think that you rather want an if statement:

if (y == x) {
  if (test('a')) {
    group['ids']= inputs.val();
    console.log(group);
  }
}

If you also want to return the value after determining if the other statemens should run:

if (y == x) {
  if (test('a')) {
    group['ids']= inputs.val();
    console.log(group);
    return true;
  } else {
    return false;
  }
}

Alternatively:

if (y == x) {
  var cond = test('a');
  if (cond) {
    group['ids']= inputs.val();
    console.log(group);
  }
  return cond;
}
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