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I am currently trying to compare the runtimes two Fortran subroutines. Therefore I have written Matlab MEX files for easier accessing the codes from there. The first thing I did was to measure the time of an individual call of each routine (within the MEX file):

   CALL DTIME( TARRAY, TIME )

   CALL MY_PROGRAM1( ... )
   CALL DTIME( TARRAY, TIME )

and

   CALL DTIME( TARRAY, TIME )
   CALL MY_PROGRAM2( ... )
   CALL DTIME( TARRAY, TIME )

which gives 1.53s for Program 1 and 0.93s for Program 2.

Now, in order to also perform timings for smaller problems where the resolution of DTIME is not good enough, I put the calls from above into a loop to solve the problem, say 10 times:

   CALL DTIME( TARRAY, TIME )
   DO 10 K = 1, 10
      CALL MY_PROGRAM1/2( ... )
10 CONTINUE
   CALL DTIME( TARRAY, TIME )

However, now I get 9.23s for Program 1 (should now be like 15.3s) and 9.16s for Program 2, so the relations of the timings are completely different from the two calls above.

I have a 64bit ubuntu machine with 4 cores, so I suppose there might be some automatic parallelization in the DO loop of Program 1. But it seems that this is not done for Program 2, even though I used the same options for mexing. Does anyone have an idea what the problem above could be and how to solve it (maybe prevent automatic parallelization just in the loop above?)? Many thanks in advance!

Matthias

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I don't really see a problem, I would always trust the average of ten calls more than the measurement of a single call. Lots of things might be happening on your machine to slow down the execution of your first program (heavy systyem load etc.) which may have not affected the call to the second program. Always take averages of a large number of calls, preferably more than ten if possible, when timing your functions. –  Chris Aug 13 '12 at 15:52
2  
I would run each program 1, 10, 100, 1000... times each and plot the average timing per call against the number of averages. You should see the timings converge to a value, which you can then safely assume to be the time per call of each function. –  Chris Aug 13 '12 at 15:55

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