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I have the following classes:

public abstract class ClassWithHelper<T extends HelperInterface> {
    Class<T> helperClass;
    protected T helper;
        protected Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().create();

        public void loadHelper(String helperString) throws InstantiationException,        IllegalAccessException {
        if (!Strings.isNullOrEmpty(helperString)) {
            wizard = gson.fromJson(helperString, getHelperClass());
        } else {
            wizard = getHelperClass().newInstance();
        }
    }

    protected abstract Class<T> getHelperClass();
}

public class ImplementingClass extends ClassWithHelper<HelperClass> {

    @Override
    protected Class<HelperClass> getHelperClass() {
        return HelperClass.class;
    }
}    

Now, what is nice is that when I call implementingClass.helperClass, it automatically casts it to HelperClass. However, I am wondering if I really need to write and override getHelperClass. I can't write helper.getClass (because it might be null), and I know the way I have it written there is a type erasure problem.

However, is there a way for me to rewrite my code to avoid having to state the helperClass in two ways and still have type inference for it?

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2  
Would you mind editing your post to have the code nicely formatted? –  Thomas Aug 13 '12 at 15:14
    
Yes, better formatting would help. Also, some things seem to be missing from the code. Is T a type parameter for the ClassWithHelper class? Does ImplementingClass provide a type argument for T? –  Stuart Marks Aug 13 '12 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this :

protected Class<T> getHelperClass() {
    final ParameterizedType parameterizedType = (ParameterizedType) getClass().getGenericSuperclass();
    return (Class<T>) parameterizedType.getActualTypeArguments()[0];
}
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That works. Brilliant code. I'll have to figure it out later! –  Joe Aug 13 '12 at 17:43

Afaik, unless you can reflect on helper, there is unfortunately no runtime type information available - generics are strictly a compile-time tool.

There are different ways you could do this - include the type as a parameter to ClassWithHelper's constructor instead of overriding a method, or force subtypes to provide helperFromJSON and newHelper method - if you think that looks better, but if you need the type at runtime, you do need to "state it in two ways".

share|improve this answer

How about this:

public abstract class ClassWithHelper<T extends HelperInterface> {
    Class<T> helperClass;
    protected T helper;
    protected Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().create();

    public void loadHelper(String helperString) throws InstantiationException,        IllegalAccessException {
        if (!Strings.isNullOrEmpty(helperString)) {
            wizard = gson.fromJson(helperString, getHelperClass());
        } else {
            wizard = getHelperClass().newInstance();
        }
    }

    public Class<T> getHelperClass() {
        return helperClass;
    }

    protected ClassWithHelper(Class<T> helperClass) {
        this.helperClass = helperClass;
    }

}

public class ImplementingClass extends ClassWithHelper<HelperClass> {

    public ImplementingClass() {
        super(HelperClass.class);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
That might be about as good as it gets. In your way of writing it, you still have to write HelperClass twice. –  Joe Aug 13 '12 at 17:36

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