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I know nothing about javascript. Just want to tweak a chunk of code a little bit, but couldn't find answers on the net, or at least one that i can understand. Hope you can help me out.

It's an onMouseover/onClick javascript (plays audio) event for HTML5. The HEAD part of the script says in one place:


<Script>
............
...........

}
    else{
        return {playclip:function(){throw new Error("Your browser doesn't support HTML5 audio unfortunately")}}
    }

In other words, as best as I can understand, this means if the User's browser doesn't support HTML5 audio, the script will return this error message/dialog: "Your browser doesn't support HTML5 audio unfortunately".

But, I don't want this error message/dialog to be returned/generated/thrown whatever! Instead, I would prefer greatly the script to send the User automatically, before it shows any error message whatsoever, to a NEW non-HTML5 javascriptless plain webpage.

What can I do?

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So, change the function, and make it do something else. return {playclip:function(){ alert('hi'); }} –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 13 '12 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

Your else statement returns an object with one property (called playclip) which is a function that throws an error. If you'd like to redirect the user to another page instead, simply do a redirect instead of throwing an error:

else {
    return {
        playclip: function() {
            // it might be nice to tell a user why they're being redirected:
            alert('You are being redirected to another page because your browser does not support HTML5 audio!');
            window.location.href = 'whateverPageYouWant.html';
        }
    };
}
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Thanks for the answer. If the 'whateverPageYouWant.html' is in the same folder/directory as this file (with this javascript) is in, can I then write only the html filename, like we can do in HTML, or do I have to write the full URL of the 'whateverPageYouWant.html' here? (I can't check the "only the html filename" option at this moment since I don't have an older browser). –  Mon Aug 13 '12 at 21:48
    
@Mon just the file name should suffice - if you don't provide a host in a URL, the browser uses the current host. –  jbabey Aug 14 '12 at 12:21

you could do

window.location.href = "myhtml.html";

to direct to a new site immediately instead of the line "return..."

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Thanks for the answer. If the "myhtml.html" is in the same folder/directory as this file (with this javascript) is in, can I then write only the html filename, like we can do in HTML, or do I have to write the full URL of the "myhtml.html" here? (I can't check the "only the html filename" option at this moment since I don't have an older browser). –  Mon Aug 13 '12 at 21:50
    
in my example i am using relative path. You can use absolute path too. So direct answer is yes. You can just write the filename if the calling file is inside the same folder. –  Less Aug 22 '12 at 13:37

the simplest thing to do is change the location to another url.

else {
    window.location = 'http://newnonhtml5webpage/';
}
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