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i have a bit of a problem here, i am about to give it up myself, and i hope experts in here can help me salvage my data.

i have a program to collect some financial data. the format of data is the following

time, data

time, data

...

it is in a text format, i have about 30 files each around 1-2 GB. the problem i have is when i first start it, i have accidentally format it in a 12 hour time format "yyyy/MM/dd hh:mm:ss.fff" instead of 2400 hour time "yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss.fff".

now my data is on a 12 hour format without am / pm.

i now need to write a program to convert the 12 hour format into 2400 format. the problems i face are the following:

  1. the data is arranged in roughly a chronological order. the timestamp is from the data server and depends on the internet traffic, the order may be of 1 sec or so. but given the amount of data i have collected, it may be up to 100000 lines out of order.

  2. without the am / pm, 1200 maybe 1200 am (which i need to subtract 12 hours from it) or 1200pm which i dont do anything.

  3. the start of the file may start at any given time (i manually turn on the program to collect, so the time is not exact), so without looking ahead and see the day change, i would not know if 10:00 is am or pm

i try to convert the time before but unsuccessfully. can anyone help me by provide some code or pseudo code?

EDIT: Now i can word my problem exactly, i need to figure out if i am in AM mode or PM mode from the data, if there are not so many lines, i can probably use excel and correct it, manually look at the next few lines and deduce if it is AM mode or PM mode. With 1/2 billion lines, i need to programming it logically to determine if it is AM or PM mode, which i have difficulty doing so. and how do i deal with those few minutes that is out of order during transition time?

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Do the file creation times coincide with the correct first-line time? –  My Other Me Aug 13 '12 at 15:30
    
how rough is chronological order, i.e., will records be more that one minute out of sequence? –  Les Aug 13 '12 at 15:34
    
Refer to this document: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8kb3ddd4.aspx –  DelegateX Aug 13 '12 at 15:37
    
@ my other me, i never thought about using the creation time for reference, i would investigate with that –  Clayton Leung Aug 13 '12 at 17:14
    
@ Les, it will about a few seconds out of order, but not more than 1 minute –  Clayton Leung Aug 13 '12 at 17:14
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2 Answers 2

12am is 0000 and 12pm is 1200, but 1am is 0100 and 1pm is 1300 (So there is more to it than just subtracting 12 from 12am.

If you read in the time to a DateTime object, it is as simple as using the .AddHours(double)

myDateTime=myDateTime.AddHours(12);//Add 12 hours
//Or
myDateTime=myDateTime.AddHours(-12);//Subtract 12 hours

How you decide if you are in AM or PM mode is up to you, I don't quite follow why you cannot fix the problem since you said the data is generated at any time.

I would say if you run "yyyy/MM/dd hh:mm:ss.fff" (the 12hour format with no am/pm) on the string.

  • If it works you know that: The date is either still in am/pm mode OR in the AM in 24hour format
  • If it fails you know that: The date is in 24hour mode and it is PM (since it will be out of the range of the 12hour mode)

Using the format "yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss.fff" should always parse your string and you know the following:

  • If it REALLY is an AM time, you have the correct date.
  • If the time is over 12:59, you will have the correct date for the PM(since it reported it in 24hour format)
  • If the date should be a PM time, but read in as an AM time, then you know you're in 12hour format and need to examine previous or following lines to try to determine if it should be AM or PM.

You can probably devise some sort of logic from that information and any other date/time information to get your desired results.

EDIT:

What you might be able to do is look at the file modified time (or the create time if you can) which should give you the AM or PM. You should then know if the first(or last) entry is AM/PM and can then proceed from there.

Example: If the time on the last entry was 11:00 (AM) and then next line is 3:00 for the same day, you would know that it is 3:00 (PM). However, if the day changes you might not be able to tell if the entry starts on AM/PM. Looking at all the data for a given day might be able to give you the answer. If the day's entries are only from AM or only PM you will not be able to tell for certain.

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@ Plater, thanks, i kinda get what you mean, i have never thought about that and need to digest it. –  Clayton Leung Aug 13 '12 at 17:20
    
now i understands what you mean, i come back to square one. the problem i am facing is i need to figure out if i am in AM mode or PM mode from the data, if there are not so many lines, i can probably use excel and correct it, manually look at the next few lines and deduce if it is AM mode or PM mode. With 1/2 billion lines, i need to programming it logically to determine if it is AM or PM mode, which i have difficulty doing so. –  Clayton Leung Aug 13 '12 at 17:32
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Assuming there are never more than 12 hours between records, your conversion program just needs to keep track of whether it's currently looking at AM or PM times. Then whenever the hour reaches 12 or wraps around to a lower number, you toggle the AM/PM flag. You'll have to provide a parameter telling it which mode to start in.

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