Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm doing some Perl and seeing my nested "if" statements is driving me mad. I managed to reduce some of them with guard blocks in another section, but I'm stuck here.

Do you think I may leave the code as is, or is there a "proper" way to refactor the following ? (I also admit being relatively new to Perl)

This is actually a subroutine asking for user input on each parameters of a list (external file). $[3] is the matching pattern, $[2] is the default value for the considered parameter (NULL if there is none), $_[1] specifies if it is mandatory or not. the 'next' statement refers to the next parameter read (while loop).

With everyone's help (thanks !), here's the newest version.

100         if ( $input ne '' && ( $input !~ $match || $input =~ /'.+'/ ) ) {
101             print "! Format not respected. Match : /$match/ (without \' \')\n";
102             next;
103         }
104         if ( $input eq '' ) {
105             if ( $default eq 'NULL' ) {
106                 if ( $manda eq 'y' ) {
107                     print "! Mandatory parameter not filled in\n";
108                     next;
109                 }
110                 print "+ Ignoring parameter.\n";
111                 $input = '';
112             }
113             else {
114                 print "+ Using default value\n";
115                 $input = $default;
116             }
117         }


 98        if($input eq ''){
 99             if($_[2] eq 'NULL'){
100                 if($_[1] eq 'y'){
101                     print "! Mandatory parameter not filled in\n";
102                     next;
103                 }
104                 else{
105                     print "+ Ignoring parameter.\n";
106                     $input = '';
107                 }
108             }
109             else{
110                 print "+ Using default value\n";
111                 $input = $_[2];
112             }
113         }
114         elsif($input !~ $_[3] || $input =~ /'.+'/){
115                 print "! Format not respected. Match : /$_[3]/ (without \' \')\n"; 
116                 next;
117             }
118         }
share|improve this question
1  
What specifically is it that is driving you mad about those nested ifs? –  innaM Jul 28 '09 at 12:35
    
I don't know, I just feel like there is another way of writing that... –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 12:39

10 Answers 10

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here's a slightly more readable version of chaos' answer:

# Set sane variable names...
my ($is_required, $default, $pattern) = @_

# Convert the external string convention for simpler evaluation...
$default = undef if $default eq 'NULL'

# Refuse problematic input before going any further...
if ($input ne '' && $input !~ $pattern || $input =~ /'.+'/) {
    print "! Format not respected. Match : /$pattern/ (without \' \')\n"; 
    next;
}


# If there was no input string...
if($input eq '') {

    # Set the default, if one was provided...
    if( $default ) {
        print "+ Using default value\n";
        $input = $default;
    } 
    # otherwise, complain if a default was required...
    else {
        if( $is_required eq 'y' ){
            print "! Mandatory parameter not filled in\n";
            next;
        }
        print "+ Ignoring parameter (no input or default provided).\n";
    }
}

The key points are:

  • You don't need else if you are exiting the current loop with next
  • Exceptional cases should be handled first
  • You can greatly improve readability by using named variables
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. Our replies crossed (see my first post edit). Btw, in my code, $is_required forces user to fill in, it's not a complaint :p (Doesn't change anything though and you haven't read the whole subroutine) –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 13:26
    
Sorry to double post, but I like your way of commenting; and by "you haven't read" I meant "I haven't posted". –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 13:28
    
Thanks, although I can't claim any credit. The commenting style is Damian Conway's - I adopted it after reading his stuff because I liked it too. ;) –  ire_and_curses Jul 28 '09 at 13:45

An alternative approach that sometimes helps with readability is to put some or all of the branches in well-named code references. Here is a start on the idea:

$format_not_respected = sub {
    return 0 if ...;
    print "! Format not respected....";
    return 1;
}
$missing_mandatory_param = sub {
    return 0 if ...;
    print "! Mandatory parameter not filled in\n";
    return 1;
}

next if $format_not_respected->();
next if $missing_mandatory_param->();
etc...
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know about that, thanks ! Even if in my case, I'm already in a subroutine (nested if or sub-sub-routine, that is the question), that might come in handy for other scripts. –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 13:31
    
That's going to compile a couple of subs every time you call this function--is that really what you want to do? It's a neat idea--and I gave you an up, but if this is going to be called a lot, it's better not to use capture behavior. (I think.) –  Axeman Jul 28 '09 at 21:46

The main concern is to keep the code readable.

If you can get readable code with nested if statements, go ahead. But keep common sense active at all times.

share|improve this answer
    
Should you have to maintain my code, would you have difficulties doing so ? –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 12:59
    
@Isaac, no. (But I'm trained to maintain hard to read code so I'm not a good reference). –  Toon Krijthe Jul 28 '09 at 13:12
if($input ne '' && ($input !~ $_[3] || $input =~ /'.+'/)) {
    print "! Format not respected. Match : /$_[3]/ (without \' \')\n"; 
    next;
}
if($input eq '') {
    if($_[2] eq 'NULL') {
        if($_[1] eq 'y'){
            print "! Mandatory parameter not filled in\n";
            next;
        }
        print "+ Ignoring parameter.\n";
        $input = '';
    } else {
        print "+ Using default value\n";
        $input = $_[2];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like that ! Thanks ! (except the cuddled else :p) –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 12:52

Common practice is to define constants for your array indexes, and give them meaningful names. Such as:

use constant MANDATORY => 1,
             DEFAULT => 2,
             PATTERN => 3;
...
if($_[DEFAULT] eq 'NULL') {
   ...
}

As far as nesting -- You should often try to reduce the indent (meaning keeping the level of nesting low), but never do so at the expense of keeping the code understandable. I have no problem with the level of nesting, but this is also just a small cut of your code. If it's really an issue, you could break out the conditions into separate subroutines.

share|improve this answer
    
As I said, it's a subroutine, all my variables are local. I therefore cannot use the "use" statement ? Nesting is not an issue on the rest of the code, thankfully. Thanks for your answer. –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 12:49
1  
'use constant' has some drawbacks. Constants created with use constant cannot be interpolated (e.g. in strings), as they have no sigil, and aren't lexically scoped at runtime. They're package-scoped and generated at compile time. This is a problem if you have a constant set at runtime, e.g. by a function. This is described much better, and with excellent examples, in the book 'Perl Best Practices', by Damian Conway. –  ire_and_curses Jul 28 '09 at 13:17

If you logic required nested if statement then I guess there is nothing wrong with them.

However, you could improve your code's readability by

  1. Using just a little more white space and
  2. By using your own variables instead of operating directly on @_

Isn't this a bit more readable?

 98        if ($input eq '') {
 99             if ($default eq 'NULL'){
100                 if ($input eq 'y'){
101                     print "! Mandatory parameter not filled in\n";
102                     next;
103                 }
104                 else {
105                     print "+ Ignoring parameter.\n";
106                     $input = '';
107                 }
108             }
109             else {
110                 print "+ Using default value\n";
111                 $input = $default;
112             }
113         }
114         elsif ($input !~ $foo || $input =~ /'.+'/) {
115                 print "! Format not respected. Match : /$foo/ (without \' \')\n"; 
116                 next;
117             }
118         }
share|improve this answer
    
About point 1., i'm using Perltidy every once in a while. I'm currently trying to solve problems and debug beforehand. 2. I read (in O'reilly's book and elsewhere) that it $_ and $@ were extensively used, without mentionning any drawback ? –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 12:44
    
1. Trying to solve problems is way easier with easy to read code. 2. The drawback is readability. When replacing your various uses of $_[x], e.g., I immediately noticed that your description of what those variables hold can not be entirely correct. –  innaM Jul 28 '09 at 12:48
    
1. You're absolutely right. I like the code as it is, but it will certainly be maintained by others (first being you). 2. @_ is an array holding the list of parameters passed (by value) to the function. Right ? As for $_, I'm only using it when r/w (into) a filehandle. –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 12:57
1  
You're right about @_. But it's best practice to get the values in @_ into scalar variables with decent names. –  innaM Jul 28 '09 at 13:01
    
Yes, sir. Will do. Thanks ! –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 13:03

Given that you will probably do a spaghetti goto otherwise, Absolutely No.

What might be better is a switch case.

share|improve this answer
    
I learned my lesson : goto is HELL. ;) Never even thought about it. Switch case doesn't really apply here, since i'm testing 4 different variables. –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 12:50
    
Don't you mean given/when? –  Brad Gilbert Jul 28 '09 at 21:05
    
Isn't it only implemented with 'use feature' or 'use switch 'perl 6.0'' ? –  Isaac Clarke Jul 30 '09 at 6:53

you could simplify to the following if you don't like all the else's.

if($input eq ''){
    $input = $_[2];
    $output = "+ Using default value\n";
    if($_[2] eq 'NULL'){
        $input = '';
        $output = "+ Ignoring parameter.\n";
        if($_[1] eq 'y'){
            $output = "! Mandatory parameter not filled in\n";
        }
    }
}
elsif($input !~ $_[3] || $input =~ /'.+'/){
    $output = "! Format not respected. Match : /$_[3]/ (without \' \')\n"; 
}
print $output;
share|improve this answer
    
imho, it lost some readability. Thanks anyway ;) –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 12:51

I think the main (if not only) reason for concerns regardong nesting is algorithm complexity. On the other cases you should worry about readability and maintainability, which can be adressed with propoer commenting and indentation.

I always find a good exercise in maintanability to read old code of mine, not only to feedback on readability but also on technique...

share|improve this answer

I suppose you could do logic combinations to flatten it out:

if(($input eq '')&&($_[2] eq 'NULL')&&($_[1] eq 'y')){
  print "! Mandatory parameter not filled in\n";
  next;
}

elsif(($input eq '')&&($_[2] eq 'NULL')){
  print "+ Ignoring parameter.\n";
  $input = '';
}

elsif($input eq ''){
  print "+ Using default value\n";
  $input = $_[2];
  next;
}


elsif($input !~ $_[3] || $input =~ /'.+'/){
  print "! Format not respected. Match : /$_[3]/ (without \' \')\n";
}

print $output;

Then you could use a switch to make it a little better.

share|improve this answer
    
This actually was my previous version, the '&&' tests didn't suit me, though. –  Isaac Clarke Jul 28 '09 at 13:01
    
This decreases both readability and speed. –  Imagist Jul 28 '09 at 13:14
    
This isn't even Perl. Perl doesn't have elseif only elsif. –  Brad Gilbert Jul 28 '09 at 21:07
    
@Imagest, readability is more important than the minor speed difference in this situation, and according to the question author, flatter was more readable to him, and it's what he asked for. @Brad Gilbert Okay, you caught me, I don't even know pearl, but it doesn't matter, it's obvious what elseif is, isn't it. I changed the answer for you. –  Shawn J. Goff Jul 29 '09 at 16:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.