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I have a Python GUI that I use to test various aspects of my work. Currently I have a "stop" button which kills the process at the end of each test (there can be multiple tests set up to run at once). However, some tests take a long time to run and if I need to stop the test I would like it to stop instantly. My thoughts are to use

import pdb; pdb.set_trace()
exit

But I'm not sure how I would inject this into the next run line of code. Is this possible?

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Are you trying to stop a python process or a python thread? –  Nick ODell Aug 13 '12 at 16:38
    
it's a separate thread. –  Brad Conyers Aug 13 '12 at 16:52

1 Answer 1

If it's a thread, you can use the lower-level thread (or _thread in Python 3) module to kill the thread with an exception by calling thread.exit().

From the documentation:

  • thread.exit(): Raise the SystemExit exception. When not caught, this will cause the thread to exit silently.

A cleaner method (depending on how your processing is set up) would be to signal the thread to stop processing and exit using a threading event, then calling the join() method from your main thread to wait until the thread exits.

Example:

class MyThread (threading.Thread):

    def __init__(self):
        super (MyThread, self).__init__()
        self._stop_req = threading.Event()

    def run(self):
        while not self._stop_req.isSet():
            pass
            #processing

        #clean up before exiting

    def stop(self):
        #triggers the threading event
        self._stop_req.set();

def main():
    #set up the processing thread
    processing_thread = MyThread()
    processing_thread.start()

    #do other things

    #stop the thread and wait for it to exit
    processing_thread.stop()
    processing_thread.join()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
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This is NOT a good example of the purpose of threading.Event. That class is for communicating between threads using the wait method, generally not signaling exits. In this case a simple instance variable would work just fine. –  Genome May 9 '14 at 14:59

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