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What is the difference between:

@Entity
public class Company {

    @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL , fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name = "companyIdRef", referencedColumnName = "companyId")
    private List<Branch> branches;
    ...
}

and

@Entity
public class Company {

    @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL , fetch = FetchType.LAZY,
    mappedBy = "companyIdRef")
    private List<Branch> branches;
    ...
}
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3 Answers 3

The annotation @JoinColumn indicates that this entity is the owner of the relationship (that is: the corresponding table has a column with a foreign key to the referenced table), whereas the attribute mappedBy indicates that the entity in this side is the inverse of the relationship, and the owner resides in the "other" entity.

In particular, for the code in the question the correct annotations would look like this:

@Entity
public class Company {
    @OneToMany(fetch = FetchType.LAZY, mappedBy = "company")
    private List<Branch> branches;
}

@Entity
public class Branch {
    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name = "companyId")
    private Company company;
}
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in both cases Branch has field with Company id. –  Mike Aug 13 '12 at 16:25
2  
Company table doesn't have a column with a foreign key to the referenced table - Branch has ref to Company.. why are you saying "the corresponding table has a column with a foreign key to the referenced table" ? Could you explain some more pls. –  Mike Aug 13 '12 at 16:33
2  
@MykhayloAdamovych I updated my answer with sample code. Notice that it's a mistake to use @JoinColumn in Company –  Óscar López Aug 13 '12 at 16:33
    
so there is no legitimate case where JoinColumn could be used in a couple with OneToMany, right? –  Mike Aug 13 '12 at 16:38
4  
@MykhayloAdamovych: No, that's actually not quite right. If Branch doesn't have a property which references Company, but the underlying table has a column which does, then you can use @JoinTable to map it. This is an unusual situation, because you would normally map the column in the object which corresponds to its table, but it can happen, and it is perfectly legitimate. –  Tom Anderson Aug 13 '12 at 17:02
up vote 33 down vote accepted

@JoinColumn could be used on both sides of the relationship. The question was about using @JoinColumn and mappedBy on the @OneToMany side (rare case). And the point here is in physical information location.

According to documentation:

Since many to one are (almost) always the owner side of a bidirectional relationship in the JPA spec, the one to many association is annotated by @OneToMany(mappedBy=...)

@Entity
public class Troop {
    @OneToMany(mappedBy="troop")
    public Set<Soldier> getSoldiers() {
    ...
}

@Entity
public class Soldier {
    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="troop_fk")
    public Troop getTroop() {
    ...
} 

Troop has a bidirectional one to many relationship with Soldier through the troop property. You don't have to (must not) define any physical mapping in the mappedBy side.

To map a bidirectional one to many, with the one-to-many side as the owning side, you have to remove the mappedBy element and set the many to one @JoinColumn as insertable and updatable to false. This solution is not optimized and will produce some additional UPDATE statements.

@Entity
public class Troop {
    @OneToMany
    @JoinColumn(name="troop_fk") //we need to duplicate the physical information
    public Set<Soldier> getSoldiers() {
    ...
}

@Entity
public class Soldier {
    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="troop_fk", insertable=false, updatable=false)
    public Troop getTroop() {
    ...
}
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I am not able to figure out how Troop can be owner in your second snippet, Soldier is still the owner, as it contains foreign key referencing to Troop. (I am using mysql, I checked with your approach). –  Akhilesh Oct 30 '13 at 7:46
    
this was taken 'as is' from documentation page (bold is mine) –  Mike Nov 1 '13 at 17:43
    
In your exemple the annotation mappedBy="troop" refer to which field? –  Fractaliste Mar 25 at 9:16
    
to the getter getTroop() –  Mike May 15 at 6:52

The annotation mappedBy ideally should always be used in the Parent side (Company class) of the bi directional relationship, in this case it should be in Company class pointing to the member variable 'company' of the Child class (Branch class)

The annotation @JoinColumn is used to specify a mapped column for joining an entity association, this annotation can be used in any class (Parent or Child) but it should ideally be used only in one side (either in parent class or in Child class not in both) here in this case i used it in the Child side (Branch class) of the bi directional relationship indicating the foreign key in the Branch class.

below is the working example :

parent class , Company

@Entity
public class Company {


    private int companyId;
    private String companyName;
    private List<Branch> branches;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    @Column(name="COMPANY_ID")
    public int getCompanyId() {
        return companyId;
    }

    public void setCompanyId(int companyId) {
        this.companyId = companyId;
    }

    @Column(name="COMPANY_NAME")
    public String getCompanyName() {
        return companyName;
    }

    public void setCompanyName(String companyName) {
        this.companyName = companyName;
    }

    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY,cascade=CascadeType.ALL,mappedBy="company")
    public List<Branch> getBranches() {
        return branches;
    }

    public void setBranches(List<Branch> branches) {
        this.branches = branches;
    }


}

child class, Branch

@Entity
public class Branch {

    private int branchId;
    private String branchName;
    private Company company;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    @Column(name="BRANCH_ID")
    public int getBranchId() {
        return branchId;
    }

    public void setBranchId(int branchId) {
        this.branchId = branchId;
    }

    @Column(name="BRANCH_NAME")
    public String getBranchName() {
        return branchName;
    }

    public void setBranchName(String branchName) {
        this.branchName = branchName;
    }

    @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name="COMPANY_ID")
    public Company getCompany() {
        return company;
    }

    public void setCompany(Company company) {
        this.company = company;
    }


}
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