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std::string nonSpecStr = "non specialized func";
std::string const nonTemplateStr = "non template func";

class Base {};
class Derived : public Base {};

template <typename T> std::string func(T * i_obj)
{ 
   ( * i_obj) += 1;
   return nonSpecStr; 
}

std::string func(Base * i_obj) { return nonTemplateStr; }

void run()
{
   // Function resolution order
   // 1. non-template functions
   // 2. specialized template functions
   // 3. template functions
   Base * base = new Base;
   assert(nonTemplateStr == func(base));

   Base * derived = new Derived;
   assert(nonTemplateStr == func(derived));

   Derived * derivedD = new Derived;

   // When the template function is commented out, this
   // resolves to the regular function. But when the template
   // function is uncommented, this fails to compile because
   // Derived does not support the increment operator. Since
   // it doesn't match the template function, why doesn't it
   // default to using the regular function?
   assert(nonSpecStr == func(derivedD));
}
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marked as duplicate by David Rodríguez - dribeas, Griwes, Bo Persson, EdChum, laalto Mar 6 at 12:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Template argument deduction makes T* a better match. –  Xeo Aug 13 '12 at 16:30
    
@Xeo Yes, but since the Derived class doesn't support the += operator, I thought that it would NOT be considered a better match. Basically, I assumed that the compiler goes through the functions one by one from best potential match to worst potential match, and stops when it finds a match that will actually compile. Does it actually work like that? –  Chris Morris Aug 13 '12 at 16:35
1  
It does go through the functions, but only through their signature. It doesn't even look at the body of the function. –  Xeo Aug 13 '12 at 16:36
1  
@ChrisMorris No, the 2 things happen in separate phases. Overload resolution picks the best match, which happens to be the template function (since no conversion from Derived * to Base * is required). Actual compilation of the function body is done at a later stage. –  Praetorian Aug 13 '12 at 16:36
    
@Xeo 'It only looks at the signature, and this is done before compilation' <------This is enlightening. Thanks. –  Chris Morris Aug 13 '12 at 16:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Template argument deduction makes your template function an exact match with by deducing T as Derived. Overload resolution only looks at the signature of the function, and doesn't look at the body at all. How else would it work to declare a function, call it in some code, and define it later?

If you actually want this behaviour of checking the operations on a type, you can do so with SFINAE:

// C++11
template<class T>
auto f(T* p)
    -> decltype((*p)+=1, void())
{
  // ...
}

This will make substitution fail if T doesn't support operator+=.

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Type T can be an exact match which will not require an implicit conversion in the first place, so it is preferable to your Base class version of the non-template function.

You can specialize the template function for a type that doesn't meet the implicit contract and have it call the non templated function instead if you find this problematic. Equally, you can provide non-templated versions matching the exact derived classes you will use so that implicit conversions are not required. Both of these options are more painful than just not using that operator though. Code your templates so their implicit template contracts require as little as possible :)

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but since the Derived class doesn't support the += operator, I thought that it would NOT be considered a better match. Basically, I assumed that the compiler goes through the functions one by one from best potential match to worst potential match, and stops when it finds a match that will actually compile. Does it actually work like that? –  Chris Morris Aug 13 '12 at 16:36
1  
Unfortunately, only sigs are accounted for :(\ –  w00te Aug 13 '12 at 16:38
    
Yep, just learned that. That makes a lot of things make more sense now. –  Chris Morris Aug 13 '12 at 16:40

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