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Can anyone explain the actual use of method hiding in C# with a valid example ?

If the method is defined using the new keyword in the derived class, then it cannot be overridden. Then it is the same as creating a fresh method (other than the one mentioned in the base class) with a different name.

Is there any specific reason to use the new keyword?

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1  
What do you mean by a "valid example"? An example that is simply syntactically correct, or an example that shows best practices for method hiding? –  Colin Mackay Jul 28 '09 at 12:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

C# not only supports method overriding, but also method hiding. Simply put, if a method is not overriding the derived method, it is hiding it. A hiding method has to be declared using the new keyword. The correct class definition in the second listing is thus:

    using System;
    namespace Polymorphism
    {
        class A
        {
            public void Foo() { Console.WriteLine("A::Foo()"); }
        }

        class B : A
        {
            public new void Foo() { Console.WriteLine("B::Foo()"); }
        }

        class Test
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                A a;
                B b;

                a = new A();
                b = new B();
                a.Foo();  // output --> "A::Foo()"
                b.Foo();  // output --> "B::Foo()"

                a = new B();
                a.Foo();  // output --> "A::Foo()"
            }
        }
    }
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I guess the same can be acheived without the new keyword, only thing is the compiler gives a warning . otherwise does it have any significant difference.? –  vijaysylvester Jul 29 '09 at 4:02
    
no, there is no difference, compiler gives a warning and it works as you wrote new keyword if you don't pay attention to warning –  ArsenMkrt Jul 29 '09 at 4:21
    
The important thing here is that the type of the reference determines the method called. –  Anderson Imes Sep 14 '09 at 7:35
    
Complete article can be found at akadia.com/services/dotnet_polymorphism.html –  Groo Dec 31 '09 at 8:21

One slightly obscure scenario where method hiding would be appropriate, but for a lack of any clean idiomatic way of expressing it, is in circumstances where a base class exposes a protected member to an inheritable descendant, but that descendant knows that there is no way any further derived classes could use that member without breaking things. A prime example of a method which many classes should hide (but very few do) is MemberwiseClone(). In many cases, if a class has a private member which expects to be the only extant reference to a mutable object, there is no possible means by which a derived class could ever use MemberwiseClone() correctly.

Note that hiding of protected members does not constitute a violation of the LSP. Conformance with the LSP requires that in places where code might be expecting reference to a base-class object but receives a reference to a derived-class object, the latter object should work as would the base-class one. Protected members, however, are outside the scope of the LSP, since every type knows its base type absolutely. If Bar and Boz both derive from Foo, and Boz hides a protected member that Bar requires, the fact that Boz hides the member won't affect Bar, because Bar's base-type instance can't possibly be a Boz or anything other than Foo. No substitution is possible, and hence substitutability is irrelevant.

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i think its better to add some lines of code to your answer .trust me , its better ;) –  siamak Mar 17 '13 at 16:45

One use I sometimes have for the new keyword is for 'poor mans property covariance' in a parallell inheritance tree. Consider this example:

public interface IDependency
{
}

public interface ConcreteDependency1 : IDependency
{
}

public class Base
{
  protected Base(IDependency dependency)
  {
    MyDependency = dependency;
  }

  protected IDependency MyDependency {get; private set;}
}

public class Derived1 : Base // Derived1 depends on ConcreteDependency1
{
  public Derived1(ConcreteDependency1 dependency)  : base(dependency) {}

  // the new keyword allows to define a property in the derived class
  // that casts the base type to the correct concrete type
  private new ConcreteDependency1 MyDependency {get {return (ConcreteDependency1)base.MyDependency;}}
}

The inheritance tree Derived1 : Base has a 'parallell dependency' on ConcreteDependency1 : IDependency'. In the derived class, I know that MyDependency is of type ConcreteDependency1, therefore I can hide the property getter from the base class using the new keyword.

EDIT: see also this blog post by Eric Lippert for a good explanation of the new keyword.

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1  
interesting -> +1 –  Juri Jul 28 '09 at 13:14
    
That was really good dude . i was not aware of those intricacies –  vijaysylvester Aug 22 '09 at 14:27
    
Agreed, +1 for informative and useful example. –  shambulator Jun 16 '10 at 9:43

I think ArsenMkrt's example is not fully correct, at least it does not fully explain the hiding feature. By dropping the new keyword from the Foo method in class B, you will still get the output

A::Foo()
B::Foo()
A::Foo()

In a programming language like Java, where all methods are "virtual", you'd expect to get the output

A::Foo()
B::Foo()
B::Foo()

by taking ArsenMkrt's code above, due to the instantiation

A a;
B b;

a = new A();
b = new B();
a.Foo(); 
b.Foo(); 

a = new B(); //<< Here
a.Foo();

In his example however, you still get "A::Foo()" because in C# methods aren't virtual by default and so the method B::Foo() automatically hides A's Foo(). To achieve the polymorphic behavior one has to write it as follows instead:

class A
{
    public virtual void Foo() { Console.WriteLine("A::Foo()"); }
}

class B : A
{
    public override void Foo() { Console.WriteLine("B::Foo()"); }
}

Now is where the "new" keyword comes in. Actually when you leave the "override" from B::Foo(), then you again would hide A::Foo() meaning that you don't override it's default behavior and you don't achieve polymorphism, i.e. you get "A::Foo()" again as output. The same can be achieved - and here's where I don't 100% understand why you HAVE to put it - by placing the "new" keyword like..

class A
{
    public virtual void Foo() { Console.WriteLine("A::Foo()"); }
}

class B : A
{
    public new void Foo() { Console.WriteLine("B::Foo()"); }
}

and you again get the output

A::Foo()
B::Foo()
A::Foo()
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1  
question is market C# as you see –  ArsenMkrt Jul 28 '09 at 13:31
3  
Juri highlights a difference with Java, but he is talking about C#... –  jeroenh Jul 28 '09 at 13:39

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