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I've been learning Javascript using Object-Oriented JavaScript by Stoyan Stefanov

He offers an example comparing global and local scope:

var a = 123;
function f() {
    alert(a);
    var a = 1;
    alert(a);
}
f();

Looking at this example, I expected the first alert to be '123' and the second alert to be '1'. Lo and behold, Stoyan says:

You might expect that the first alert() will display 123 (the value of the global variable a) and the second will display 1 (the local a). This is not the case. The first alert will show “undefined”. This is because inside the function the local scope is more important than the global scope. So a local variable overwrites any global variable with the same name. At the time of the first alert() a was not yet defined (hence the value undefined) but it still existed in the local space.

The explanation was not clear to me, how can the local variable overwrite the global variable in the first alert? Any other/different explanations would be appreciated.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is not overriding the global variable. What is happening is called "variable hoisting". That is, a var a; gets inserted at the top of the function.

The script engine changes your script to be the following:

var a = 123;
function f() {
    var a;
    alert(a);
    a = 1;
    alert(a);
}
f();

Lesson to learn: Always declare your variables before you use them. Some will say declare all your variables at the top of the function.

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Thanks Juan. I'm guessing that you would take issue with the authors use of the term overwrite? I began thinking it was a misnomer b/c if I call alert(a) outside of the function, I get '123', which suggests no overwriting but two 'a' variables, one global and one local. –  steve-er-rino Aug 13 '12 at 17:15
3  
Override is not the correct term, the local variable shadows the global variable, but the real issue is to understand that if you have a var anywhere within the function, the global is shadowed throughout the entire function, even before it's declared. –  Juan Mendes Aug 13 '12 at 17:16
    
thanks, this is helpful and clarifying –  steve-er-rino Aug 13 '12 at 17:21
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In simple words, all the declarations, of both variables and functions are considered first. So local var a in effect will override global variable only in local scope and will have no value i.e. undefined. So first alert will show undefined. Second alert will show 1 as it is after a = 1. This just happens locally and global variable a will have value 123 - it won't be changed.

another example using function to show how it works

 function show(){
    alert("I am global");
 }

 function f() {

    show();

    show = function(){
       alert("I am second");
    }  

    show();   

    function show(){
        alert("I am first");
    }

}
f();
show();
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I don't see how this example helps understand variable hoisting, you don't even have a local var. The words in the answer seem correct (though confusing), but the example makes this extra confusing –  Juan Mendes Aug 13 '12 at 17:20
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