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I have been practicing constructor dependency injection throughout my PHP application. I didn't want to be littering my code with object creation, so factories to the rescue, or at least I thought.

I set about wiring up components with factories, then some factories started using other factories to get dependencies, great, keeps all the creation code in one place. However, once factories start using each other (or as in the code below, itself) I ran into circular dependency issues, that simply cannot be resolved. For example, my MapperFactory uses itself to inject mappers with other mappers (they need each other to build a full object graph 'eager loading'):

class MapperFactory
{   
    public function create($type)
    {
        switch (true) {
            case 'Item':
                $mapper = new ItemMapper(
                    $this->create('Field')  
                );               
                break;
            case 'Field':
                $mapper = new ItemMapper(
                    $this->create('Item')  
                );
                break;
            default:
                throw new Exception('Unknown mapper');
        }
        return $mapper;
    }

}

$mf = new MapperFactory();
$mf->create('Item');

Its a simplified example, but an increasingly common issue as the application is developing. Error back from PHP (xdebug installed) is:

Fatal error: Maximum function nesting level of '100' reached, aborting!

Fully understand why PHP is complaining (although didn't see it coming TBH).

My question is, have I completely missed the point of factories? am I using factories correctly? It would seem not, but other than the circular dependency (pretty major but), factories are an elegant solution to hiding all the construction/wiring logic away from the main application.

share|improve this question
    
I don't think it's an issue with factories. First, I don't get the "switch (true)" part. Shouldn't that be "switch ($type)"? Second, your code (if I read it right) endlessly recurses. Perhaps you should only create the sub-field or sub-item when you're ready to use that instance variable. Or come up with something that ends the recursion. –  Marvo Aug 13 '12 at 17:25
    
I guess switch (true) ... is not what you meant to write. But even with switch ($type) you'd get an infinite loop if $type is either Field or Item. –  Yoshi Aug 13 '12 at 17:26
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could try using a setter for injecting the dependencies. Then you'd create both mappers like this:

$itemMapper = new Mapper();
$fieldMapper = new Mapper();
$itemMapper->setRelatedMapper($fieldMapper);
$fieldMapper->setRelatedMapper($itemMapper);

And then use the switch just to return the mapper. This should get rid of the circular dependencies when creating objects.

Having said that, if you are doing this as a sort of OR/M thing to connect to a database, you should maybe look into stuff like Doctrine2 or Propel, just to save yourself the trouble of inventing the wheel when there are already tried and tested solutions out there.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I had experimented with setters, although consider dependencies to be a 'requirement' thus making them required in the constructor. But definately something I will have to look at again. ORM wise, I need to persist objects via SOAP and REST services aswell, so need to maintain the flexibility. –  user1595982 Aug 13 '12 at 20:04
    
Yeah, the constructor is a way of enforcing the relationships, but in your example it creates a loop, because the "item" creates "field" which creates "item" and so on... By using setters, you just share the references between the objects, and while a var dump or something similar would also show an endless hierarchy of objects, at least it does not break. And you are creating only two instances, as opposed to an infinity... –  Pinetree Aug 13 '12 at 22:18
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Looks like MapperFactory's create method causes an endless loop.

switch(true) {
  case 'Item' : // this will always be selected http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.type-juggling.php
    $mapper = new ItemMapper(
      $this->create('Field'); // Forces loop,
    );

If the switch is looking for TRUE match, then the case operation must be a boolean

switch(true) {
  case $type == 'Item' :
    // ...
    break;
  case $type == 'Field' :
    // ...
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, sorry, given the context of the question (circular dependencies), this is unforgivable. It should have been switch($type). –  user1595982 Aug 13 '12 at 19:57
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