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working version with minimalistic changes, thx @Matt, Petr and Landei!!!

insert :: (Ord el) => el -> Menge el -> Menge el
insert a (Menge (x:xs)) = ins a (Menge (x:xs)) (Menge [])

ins a (Menge []) (Menge ys) = Menge (ys ++ [a])
ins a (Menge xs@(x:xs')) (Menge ys)
       | a <  x     = Menge (ys ++ [a] ++ xs)
       | a >  x     = ins a (Menge xs') (Menge (ys ++ [x]))
       | otherwise  = Menge (ys ++ xs)

Have an own Datatype Menge, acts like an list and I should insert an element at the correct position...

module Menge (
  Menge,
  empty,
  insert,
  ins
) where

data Menge el = Menge [el] deriving (Eq)

instance (Show el) => Show (Menge el) where
 show (Menge liste) = "{" ++ (elms liste) ++ "}"
     where
       elms :: (Show a) => [a] -> String
       elms [] = ""
       elms (x:[]) = show x
       elms (x:xs) = show x ++ ", " ++ elms xs

empty :: Menge el
empty = Menge []

insert :: (Ord el) => el -> Menge el -> Menge el
--insert a (Menge []) = (Menge [a]) 
insert a (Menge (x:xs)) = ins a (Menge (x:xs)) (Menge [])

ins a (Menge []) (Menge (y:ys)) = (Menge ((y:ys) ++ [a]))
ins a (Menge (x:xs)) (Menge (y:ys)) 
       | a <  x = (Menge ((y:ys) ++ [a] ++ (x:xs)))
       | a >  x = ins a (Menge xs) (Menge ((y:ys) ++ [x]))
       | a >  x && xs == [] = error "same function as: ins a empty (Menge (y:ys))"
       | a == x = (Menge ((y:ys) ++ (x:xs)))
       | otherwise = error "blabla"

I type in: insert 2 (Menge ([1,3])), in my opinion i should work like:

--> ins 2 (Menge (1:3)) empty --> 2 > 1 --> ins 2 (Menge [3]) (Menge [] ++ [1])
--> ins 2 (Menge [3]) (Menge [1]) --> 2 < 3 --> (Menge ([1] ++ [2] ++ [3])) --> [1,2,3]

but instead I get: "Non-exhaustive patterns in function ins"

Same error if I type in: ins 2 (Menge ([1,3])) (Menge []), so the first step work. It seems the compiler don't like the "empty"/"(Menge [])", because if I type in: ins 2 (Menge ([1,3])) (Menge [1,3]), I get {1, 3, 2} as answer.

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3 Answers 3

I see two major problems with ins:

  1. it appears you're trying to pattern match using the value of empty -- this won't work. Any Menge, including ones with non-empty lists, will match, because empty is used here as a binding local to the function (shadowing your other binding). So you'd need instead:

    ins a (Menge []) (Menge (y:ys)) = ...
    

    A symptom of this problem is that my haskell installation gives me an pattern match(es) are overlapped warning when I load your code. This basically means that you have some dead code.

  2. your patterns don't have a match for when the 3rd argument is Menge [] -- which, I assume, is the error that gives the message you showed (although I'm not sure because you didn't give the entire error message). Both of your equations only match non-empty lists.

    For example:

    ghci> ins x (Menge []) (Menge [])
    

    will not match any patterns.

share|improve this answer
    
1. Upps, right, thanks, but earlier I used (Menge []), same problems... 2. What do u mean exactly? Menge has only one argument all the time, the list. –  Yam Aug 13 '12 at 18:27
    
@Yam the 3rd argument to the function ins :: (Ord t) => t -> Menge t -> Menge t -> Menge t (which is the 2nd arg of type Menge t) –  Matt Fenwick Aug 13 '12 at 18:34
    
1. Upps, right, thanks, but earlier I used (Menge []), same problems... 2. What do u mean exactly? Menge has only one argument all the time, the list. Do u mean the second ins argument? To clarify, u mean "empty", after "ins a" and before "(Menge (y:ys))"? The "pattern match(es) are overlapped" msg is because i tried to catch the case that the number which should we inserted is greater then the greatest number at list, twice. --> the second argument of ins is "empty and/or (Menge [])" --> "(Menge ((y:ys) ++ [a]))" –  Yam Aug 13 '12 at 18:36
    
the "3rd ins argument" is "(Menge (y:ys))"?! It grows continuous. The interruption case matches if the "2nd ins argument" "(Menge (x:xs))" is "empty" or "(Menge [])", but dont work... –  Yam Aug 13 '12 at 18:44
1  
@Yam, you should update your question with the partially-fixed code so we don't have to try to figure out what your code looks like now. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 13 '12 at 19:55

I tried to implement insert from scratch. First, I added function unmenge to make de-constructing value easier, and also modified your Menge declaration to be a newtype (just a performance optimization - this way, it doesn't actually create a new data constructor at runtime).

newtype Menge el = Menge { unmenge :: [el] }
  deriving (Eq)

Now, the insert function can be written as follows:

insert :: (Ord el) => el -> Menge el -> Menge el
insert a (Menge []) = (Menge [a]) 
insert a (Menge xs@(x:xs'))
    | a <= x    = Menge (a : xs)
    | otherwise = Menge (x : unmenge (insert a (Menge xs')))

If a is smaller than the first item in the list, it's simply prepended. If it is not, then x is the smallest number so it is put at the first place, and a is recursively inserted into the rest.

Note that this solution is not tail recursive.

Even simpler solution would be to use span function:

insert :: (Ord el) => el -> Menge el -> Menge el
insert a (Menge xs) = let (smaller, bigger) = span (<= a) xs
                        in Menge (smaller ++ [a] ++ bigger)

Edit: Your corrected code seem to work as expected. I simplified it a bit, but I didn't change anything substantial:

insert :: (Ord el) => el -> Menge el -> Menge el
insert a (Menge (x:xs)) = ins a (Menge (x:xs)) (Menge [])

ins a (Menge []) (Menge ys) = Menge (ys ++ [a])
ins a (Menge xs@(x:xs')) (Menge ys)
       | a <  x     = Menge (ys ++ [a] ++ xs)
       | a >  x     = ins a (Menge xs') (Menge (ys ++ [x]))
       | otherwise  = Menge (ys ++ xs)

Some ideas for improvements:

  • Have look at as-patterns (I used them here).
  • Appending an element at the end of a list has O(n) complexity - the whole list has to be recomputed. It would be better to keep the list in reverse order and only fix it at the end:

    ins a (Menge []) (Menge ys) = Menge (reverse ys ++ [a])
    ins a (Menge xs@(x:xs')) (Menge ys)
           | a <  x     = Menge (reverse (a : ys) ++ xs)
           | a >  x     = ins a (Menge xs') (Menge (x : ys))
           | otherwise  = Menge (reverse ys ++ xs)
    
  • There is a data structure called Data.Set that does just what you need: Keeps sorted sets of elements using binary trees. Most operations have O(1) or O(log n) complexity.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, worked great! but an idea how i can correct my code? Seems like haskell ignores the guards, e.g. insert 1 [2,3], or insert 3 [1,2], or insert 2 [1,3], nothing besides errors... "replaced "empty" with (Menge [])" –  Yam Aug 13 '12 at 18:54
    
thanks again! Optimazation is one thing i will adress later, was important to get it work first. –  Yam Aug 14 '12 at 10:57

My take:

insert :: (Ord el) => el -> Menge el -> Menge el
insert a mx = merge (Menge [a]) mx 

merge :: (Ord el) => Menge el -> Menge el -> Menge el
merge mx (Menge []) = mx  
merge (Menge []) my = my
merge (Menge (x:xs)) (Menge (y:ys)) 
  | x == y = merge (Menge xs) (Menge (y:ys))   
  | x < y = merge (Menge xs) (Menge (x:y:ys))
  | x > y = let Menge zs = merge (Menge (x:xs)) (Menge ys) 
            in Menge (y:zs)    
share|improve this answer
    
merge seems to assume a possibility of duplicates in the first Set but not in second... unless the second Set is empty and then duplicates in first are not removed...? –  Will Ness Aug 14 '12 at 10:53
    
thanks to u too! –  Yam Aug 14 '12 at 10:59
    
I didn't get the reference, :) but what I meant was, why then not simply | x == y = x : merge (Set xs) (Set ys) and | x < y = x : merge (Set xs) (Set (y:ys)), skipping a few extraneous reduction steps. And what's the purpose of explicit let in the third sub-clause? Maybe the two issues are related. –  Will Ness Aug 14 '12 at 13:25
    
Aha, have looked it up. No, your code would remove duplicates in its left argument (when right argument is not an empty Set), but not in its right argument. So it cleaned the "shit" so to speak, but partially so. :| The standard code that I mentioned in the comment above would leave more "shit" uncleaned. –  Will Ness Aug 14 '12 at 13:31

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