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I have written this code for sorting, it runs completely fine. I wanted to knwo how I can reduce its time complexity.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void sort(int a[], int n)
{
    int min, temp;
    for(int i=0;i<n-1;i++)
    {
        min=i;
        for(int j=i+1;j<n;j++)
        {
            if(a[min]>a[j])
            {
                min=j;
            }
        }
        temp=a[i];
        a[i]=a[min];
        a[min]=temp;
    }
    for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        cout<<a[i]<<endl;
    }
}
int main()
    {
    int n;
    cin>>n;
    int arr[n];
    for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        cin>>arr[i];
    }
    sort(arr,n);
    return 0;
}

If there is no other way to change it then do I have to change the algorithm? If so then please suggest an algorithm?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? Have you characterized the complexity of the routine you have? –  Michael Burr Aug 13 '12 at 17:35
    
Doing it on my own. That's why I have not asked for the code, only algo names as it is similar to homework question.m:) –  Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Aug 13 '12 at 17:39
    
@MichaelBurr just wondering if what way would the answers matter? –  Артём Царионов Aug 13 '12 at 17:46
    
@Артём Царионов: I think that people often approach answering homework-based questions in a different manner. For example, to avoid simply 'giving the answer' or to orient an answer more at fundamentals. As far as characterizing the complexity of the current routine - how can you know if you've improved things until you understand the current situation (at least somewhat)? –  Michael Burr Aug 13 '12 at 18:39
    
@MichaelBurr great point, i never understood why people care whether it's homework or not –  Артём Царионов Aug 13 '12 at 19:31
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It seems like your using some sort of selection sort, which is known to be slow. IRL applications usually use quicksort or merge-sort (not so much the latter).

I suggest you do the same (assuming this is for educational purposes).

Otherwise, use std::sort defined in <algorithm>.

Also, note that your code is not standard:

cin>>n;
int arr[n];

VLA's are not supported in C++. You're better of using a std::vector instead. If you use C++, don't write C code.

share|improve this answer
    
VLA is? Variable length arrays? –  Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Aug 13 '12 at 17:40
    
@PrakharMohan yes. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 13 '12 at 17:41
    
@LuchianGrigore- std::sort uses which algorithm to sort the array? –  Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Aug 13 '12 at 17:48
    
@PrakharMohan idk if it's enforced. From the link: Complexity Approximately N*logN comparisons on average (where N is last-first). In the worst case, up to N^2, depending on specific sorting algorithm used by library implementation. From "depending" I take it that the standard doesn't enforce a particular algorithm, but one that respects the complexity requirements. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 13 '12 at 17:49
1  
@PrakharMohan: "Wich sorting algorithm is used by STL's list::sort()?" - stackoverflow.com/questions/1717773/… –  SChepurin Aug 13 '12 at 18:13
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Your algorithm is selection sort, an O(n^2) algorithm: if the input size grows linearly in n, then the running time is proportional to a quadratic function of n. The minumum time complexity for comparison based sorts on arbitrary input (i.e. without prior knowledge about the input) is O(n log n). The STL function std::sort provides this guarantee.

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    int n;
    cin>>n;
    std::vector<int> arr;
    arr.resize(n);

    for(int i=0;i<n; ++i) // ++i rather than i++ is a good habit to get into
    {
        cin>>arr[i];
    }

    // O(N log N) complexity
    std::sort(arr.begin(), arr.end());

    return 0;
}

For small inputs, selection sort (or insertion sort) can sometimes be fast enough. You can also code this as a few-liner in C++11 (it uses a lambda-expression)

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

template<class ForwardIterator>
void selection_sort(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last)
{
        std::for_each(first, last, [](ForwardIterator it) {         // your outer loop
                auto const selection = std::min_element(it, last);  // your inner loop
                std::iter_swap(selection, it);                      // your swap code
        });
}

// call on your vector
selection_sort(arr.begin(), arr.end());

From this code, it is also obivous how selection sort works: repeatedly find the minimum element in the remaining part of the array, and swap it into place. It should be equivalent to your own code, but I hope you agree it is much easier to understand (once you get to know the STL, that is).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi there! I don't wish to offend you with this comment, but: 1) you're not helping him by providing a full solution if this is for educational purposes. 2) the code is not valid, as C++ doesn't support variable-length arrays. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 13 '12 at 17:36
    
@LuchianGrigore You're right, I was editing in steps. –  TemplateRex Aug 13 '12 at 17:37
    
+1 for standard library. :) –  perilbrain Aug 13 '12 at 17:38
    
reserve should be resize, otherwise you have undefined behavior. Also, your call to std::sort was written for an array, but now you're using a vector. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 13 '12 at 17:46
    
@BenjaminLindley Tnx! updated. –  TemplateRex Aug 13 '12 at 17:53
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You are using Selection sort to sort your array. The running time of this algorithm id O(n^2). You can use Merge sort or Heap Sort to sort which has running time of O(nlog(n)).
You can also use Intro Sort which uses a very neat trick to push QuickSort's worst case down to O(n log n) while maintaining the other good performance characteristics

Check out the wiki page on sorting algorithms for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
In practice, quicksort is the most efficient. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 13 '12 at 17:39
    
@LuchianGrigore: Quicksort has terrible worst-case for cases that are actually all too common. It's better to use a combination usually, like introsort. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 13 '12 at 17:42
1  
Actually, quicksort is no longer considered the average-case sorting king, though it was when I was in college. Now, both Python and Java have switched to timsort, which is a very nicely modified mergesort so that the merge steps are done in place. –  user1277476 Aug 13 '12 at 21:02
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