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This is a common way to set a default in Ruby:

class QuietByDefault
  def initialize(opts = {})
    @verbose = opts[:verbose]
  end
end

This is an easy trap to fall into:

class VerboseNoMatterWhat
  def initialize(opts = {})
    @verbose = opts[:verbose] || true
  end
end

This is a correct way to do it:

class VerboseByDefault
  def initialize(opts = {})
    @verbose = opts.include?(:verbose) ? opts[:verbose] : true
  end
end

What is the best / cleanest way to code VerboseByDefault? (I could factor it out, of course.)

What pattern is widely used, if any, in Ruby code in general? Does ActiveSupport have a pattern for this? (Minimal is better -- I don't need a full command line option parser.)

Ranting P.S.: I don't like the asymmetry between code that handles a default true vs. code that handles a default false option. A pattern that makes changing between the two -- without causing bugs -- would be a good thing to see.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A simple way to do it is by using the second argument to Hash#fetch

class VerboseByDefault
  def initialize(opts = {})
    @verbose = opts.fetch(:verbose, true)
  end
end

For complex defaults, fetch can also take a block, which is executed if the value isn't in the hash. See: http://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Hash.html#method-i-fetch

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Very nice! I may have seen this before, but I didn't remember it. Thanks! –  David James Aug 14 '12 at 2:04

I've commonly seen it as setting all your defaults, and then merging them with the opts. such as..

def initialize(opts = {})
  @options = { :verbose => false, :foo => 42 } 
  @options.merge!(opts)
  # ...
end

This way all of your options are set in one place and you just merge the user supplied ones.

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I like the idea of starting with defaults and merging in user supplied options, but you've got a bug in how you scope @options! Watch your self. :) –  David James Aug 13 '12 at 18:04
    
oh sorry it wasn't meant as a complete solution :) I'll edit it and put it inside... –  Doon Aug 13 '12 at 18:29
require 'active_support/core_ext/hash/reverse_merge'
class VerboseByDefault
  DEFAULTS = { verbose: true }
  def initialize(opts = {})
    opts.reverse_merge!(DEFAULTS)
    @verbose = opts[:verbose]
  end
end

This isn't only a little cleaner just for one option, but it becomes way better if you have more options. Also, it uses the same pattern for true and false.

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