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I have a string with the text precisely spaced the way I want it displayed. It's sort of an ascii art project. I want to convert this text to a pdf so I can print a poster with the text at my local printshop.

The font needs to be fixed width and there are no tabs or anything like that. The lines end in the '\n' character. There are several space characters.

The image is several hundred characters wide and several hundred high. So, it doesn't fit in the space of a typical page.

How do I do this in python?

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I would use LaTeX for this, not Python. There doesn't seem to be any necessity for programming if all you want to do is to convert a text to a PDF. (You could even use Microsoft Word for this.) –  Sven Marnach Aug 13 '12 at 17:50
1  
I agree with @SvenMarnach - were I paying a printer to do my stuff, I'd expect to get service for my £. If you're not happy with LaTeX - other options are an HTML table, or a spreadsheet of some sort - then ask them to deal with it (ie - this is what I've got, I want it to fit on A1 please...) –  Jon Clements Aug 13 '12 at 17:58
    
Remember that even when printing to PDF and giving that to your printer, they need to have the same font as the one you used. Courier New or Droid Sans Mono may both look different from one OS to another. The standard way print-based designers get around this is with "Convert to curves" or similar. But that's to get an exact 1-to-1 match of every tiny detail of the font, which you may not need. For ascii art, the same fixed-width font should be okay even if there are minor curve differences. –  aneroid Aug 13 '12 at 18:16
    
You may even be better off just giving him your text file and having him open it with Notepad++ or any non-wrapping editor. (For a really long line, Notepad will visually wrap it even if it's no-wrap and that wrap shows in the printout). The printshop ppl can then 'zoom' until it all fits in one page and print. –  aneroid Aug 13 '12 at 18:20
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try the module pyPdf, might do the trick for you!

Or pyPdf, that allows you to set the font when you create new PDF-files (setFont example)

From pyPdf homepage:

from pyfpdf import FPDF

pdf=FPDF()
pdf.add_page()
pdf.set_font('Courier','B',16)
pdf.cell(40,10,'Hello World!')
pdf.output('tuto1.pdf','F')
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Sorry, -1. Did you notice that 'the font needs to be fixed width'?? You surely know that Arial isn't exactly a fixed width font, do you? –  Kurt Pfeifle Aug 13 '12 at 22:15
    
If you put a little more effort into your answer, and if you adapt the code example better to the OP's question, then I'll take back my downvote and turn it into an upvote even :-) –  Kurt Pfeifle Aug 13 '12 at 22:17
    
Mature to downvote just to promote own answer... OP surely know too that Arial isn't fixed width, the example is quoted from the homepage. Since there are several fixed width fonts in the world, you will always have a "nice" reason to down vote. –  Qiau Aug 15 '12 at 13:52
    
Look, Qiau, I've even offered to turn the downvote into an upvote if you adapted your code example better. So your speculation about my sinister motives to downvote a competing answer don't have substance :-) –  Kurt Pfeifle Aug 15 '12 at 14:11
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There are several more methods which could create a printable file from your ASCII art.

First, ImageMagick:

To demonstrate the method...

  • ...first, create a text file named my.mvg and put the following content in:

    text 8,8 "
    
        _    ____   ____ ___ ___        _         _   
       / \  / ___| / ___|_ _|_ _|      / \   _ __| |_ 
      / _ \ \___ \| |    | | | |_____ / _ \ | '__| __|
     / ___ \ ___) | |___ | | | |_____/ ___ \| |  | |_ 
    /_/   \_\____/ \____|___|___|   /_/   \_\_|   \__|
    
    "
    
  • ...next, run one of these commands:

    convert                 \
      -font "Courier"       \
      -size 800x200 xc:none \
      -box yellow           \
      -pointsize 12         \
      -gravity center       \
      -draw @my.mvg         \
       my-ascii-art.pdf
    

    to get a PDF as output file, or

    convert                           \
      -font "Liberation-Mono-Regular" \
      -size 800x200 xc:none           \
      -box orange                     \
      -pointsize 14                   \
      -gravity center                 \
      -draw @my.mvg                   \
       my-ascii-art.png
    

    for PNG output. Of course for each of the two commands you can play with -size and -box and -pointsize to your heart's contents...

  • You may need to remove the \n character from your line ends, though...

  • Note the ImageMagick method will create raster graphics, even if the output is PDF (and probably rather large files).**

Second, a2ps + Ghostscript:

To demonstrate this method...

  • ...first, create a text file named henryb.txt with this content:

                     _   
      |_| _ ._ ._   |_)  
      | |(/_| || \/ |_)o 
                 /       
    
  • ...next, run this command to let a2ps and Ghostscript cooperate to create a PDF file:

    a2ps                      \
      --output=-              \
      --columns=1             \
      --borders=0             \
      --no-header             \
      --landscape             \
      --medium=a5             \
        henryb.txt            \
    |                         \
    gs                        \
      -o henryb.pdf           \
      -sDEVICE=pdfwrite       \
      -g1000x2500             \
      -dAutoRotatePages=/None \
      -
    

    or, for PNG output:

    a2ps                      \
      --output=-              \
      --columns=1             \
      --borders=0             \
      --no-header             \
      --landscape             \
      --medium=a5             \
        henryb.txt            \
    |                         \
    gs                        \
      -o henryb.png           \
      -sDEVICE=pngalpha       \
      -g100x250               \
      -
    

    (-gNNNxMMM gives the output dimensions in pixels. Ghostscript by default uses 720 pixels per inch for PDF distance calculations, but 72 ppi for raster image calculations, unless overridden with the -rNNN resolution setting...)

Third, enscript + Ghostscript:

To demonstrate this method...

  • ...first, create a text file named henryb-2.txt with this content:

    m    m                                    mmmmm        
    #    #  mmm   m mm    m mm  m   m         #    #       
    #mmmm# #"  #  #"  #   #"  " "m m"         #mmmm"       
    #    # #""""  #   #   #      #m#          #    #       
    #    # "#mm"  #   #   #      "#           #mmmm"   #   
                                 m"                        
                                ""                         
    
  • ...next, run this command to let enscript and Ghostscript cooperate to create a PDF file:

    enscript                  \
      --output=-              \
      --columns=1             \
      --no-header             \
      --landscape             \
      --media=A5              \
        henryb-2.txt          \
    |                         \
    gs                        \
      -o henryb-2.pdf         \
      -sDEVICE=pdfwrite       \
      -g1500x4000             \
      -
    

    or, for PNG output:

    enscript                  \
      --output=-              \
      --columns=1             \
      --no-header             \
      --landscape             \
      --media=A5              \
        henryb-2.txt          \
    |                         \
    gs                        \
      -o henryb-2.png         \
      -sDEVICE=pngalpha       \
      -g150x400               \
      -
    
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Try report lab It has some cool features like

  1. Supports embedded Type-1 or TTF fonts
  2. Supports Asian, Hebrew and Arabic characters
  3. Supports bitmap images in any popular format
  4. Supports vector graphics
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