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All I need is a way to query an NTP Server using C# to get the Date Time of the NTP Server returned as either a string or as a DateTime.

How is this possible in its simplest form?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 55 down vote accepted

Since the old accepted answer got deleted (It was a link to a Google code search results that no longer exist), I figured I could answer this question for future reference :

public static DateTime GetNetworkTime()
{
    //default Windows time server
    const string ntpServer = "time.windows.com";

    // NTP message size - 16 bytes of the digest (RFC 2030)
    var ntpData = new byte[48];

    //Setting the Leap Indicator, Version Number and Mode values
    ntpData[0] = 0x1B; //LI = 0 (no warning), VN = 3 (IPv4 only), Mode = 3 (Client Mode)

    var addresses = Dns.GetHostEntry(ntpServer).AddressList;

    //The UDP port number assigned to NTP is 123
    var ipEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(addresses[0], 123);
    //NTP uses UDP
    var socket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Dgram, ProtocolType.Udp);

    socket.Connect(ipEndPoint);

    //Stops code hang if NTP is blocked
    socket.ReceiveTimeout = 3000;     

    socket.Send(ntpData);
    socket.Receive(ntpData);
    socket.Close();

    //Offset to get to the "Transmit Timestamp" field (time at which the reply 
    //departed the server for the client, in 64-bit timestamp format."
    const byte serverReplyTime = 40;

    //Get the seconds part
    ulong intPart = BitConverter.ToUInt32(ntpData, serverReplyTime);

    //Get the seconds fraction
    ulong fractPart = BitConverter.ToUInt32(ntpData, serverReplyTime + 4);

    //Convert From big-endian to little-endian
    intPart = SwapEndianness(intPart);
    fractPart = SwapEndianness(fractPart);

    var milliseconds = (intPart * 1000) + ((fractPart * 1000) / 0x100000000L);

    //**UTC** time
    var networkDateTime = (new DateTime(1900, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc)).AddMilliseconds((long)milliseconds);

    return networkDateTime.ToLocalTime();
}

// stackoverflow.com/a/3294698/162671
static uint SwapEndianness(ulong x)
{
    return (uint) (((x & 0x000000ff) << 24) +
                   ((x & 0x0000ff00) << 8) +
                   ((x & 0x00ff0000) >> 8) +
                   ((x & 0xff000000) >> 24));
}
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2  
@MartinBookaWeser Fixed. –  Nasreddine Sep 6 '12 at 14:03
1  
really handy. thanks. –  publicENEMY Mar 15 '13 at 11:39
2  
@cvocvo For that you can use DateTime.ToLocalTime() –  Nasreddine Jun 10 '13 at 22:30
2  
Under situations where NTP is blocked this code hangs and never returns. How can I add a timeout or something to ensure this code returns? –  cvocvo Oct 28 '13 at 16:27
1  
This is one of the few pieces of code that are good enough to be cut-and-pasted directly from the Internet into production code (after testing and review of course). –  dodgy_coder Sep 23 at 5:33

This is a optimized version of the function which removes dependency on BitConverter function and makes it compatible with NETMF (.NET Micro Framework)

public static DateTime GetNetworkTime()
{
    const string ntpServer = "pool.ntp.org";
    var ntpData = new byte[48];
    ntpData[0] = 0x1B; //LeapIndicator = 0 (no warning), VersionNum = 3 (IPv4 only), Mode = 3 (Client Mode)

    var addresses = Dns.GetHostEntry(ntpServer).AddressList;
    var ipEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(addresses[0], 123);
    var socket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Dgram, ProtocolType.Udp);

    socket.Connect(ipEndPoint);
    socket.Send(ntpData);
    socket.Receive(ntpData);
    socket.Close();

    ulong intPart = (ulong)ntpData[40] << 24 | (ulong)ntpData[41] << 16 | (ulong)ntpData[42] << 8 | (ulong)ntpData[43];
    ulong fractPart = (ulong)ntpData[44] << 24 | (ulong)ntpData[45] << 16 | (ulong)ntpData[46] << 8 | (ulong)ntpData[47];

    var milliseconds = (intPart * 1000) + ((fractPart * 1000) / 0x100000000L);
    var networkDateTime = (new DateTime(1900, 1, 1)).AddMilliseconds((long)milliseconds);

    return networkDateTime;
}
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2  
Are you missing a timeout ... socket.ReceiveTimeout = 3000; ... this prevents it hanging if there's a network issue. Value is in milliseconds. –  dodgy_coder Sep 23 at 5:03

The .NET Micro Framework Toolkit found in the CodePlex has an NTPClient. I have never used it myself but it looks good.

There is also another example located here.

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