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For example, I have a Task MIS, the data is:

Id User Task TaskStartTime TaskFinishTime

1 Mike task1 2009-07-28 09:00:00 2009-07-28 09:45:00

2 Mike task2 2009-07-28 09:30:00 2009-07-28 09:40:00

3 Mike task3 2009-07-28 09:50:00 2009-07-28 10:30:00

4 Mike task4 2009-07-28 10:20:00 2009-07-28 10:30:00

5 Mike task5 2009-07-28 10:40:00 2009-07-28 11:50:00

How can I use Linq To Sql to cout the idle Time Duration for a day such as 2009-07-28?

The result should be:

5 minutes (between task1, task2 and task3) + 10 minutes (between task4 and task5)

= 15 minutes

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1  
-1 This sounds like a homework question, and you haven't given evidence of a decent attempt at solving it yourself. – Bryan Watts Jul 28 '09 at 22:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's some code that will do the work, using Linq. I don't know if it's in the form you were looking for, but the logic works with the data you gave us. You ought to be able to rearrange it into the proper shape for your app.

MODIFIED

var rows = new[] { 
    new { Id =  1, Name="Mike", TaskName="task1", StartTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 09:00:00"), EndTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 09:45:00") },
    new { Id =  2, Name="Mike", TaskName="task2", StartTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 09:30:00"), EndTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 09:40:00") },
    new { Id =  3, Name="Mike", TaskName="task3", StartTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 09:50:00"), EndTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 10:30:00") },
    new { Id =  4, Name="Mike", TaskName="task4", StartTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 10:20:00"), EndTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 10:30:00") },
    new { Id =  5, Name="Mike", TaskName="task5", StartTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 10:40:00"), EndTime=DateTime.Parse("2009-07-28 11:50:00") },
        };

var ranges = rows.Select(x => new { StartTime = x.StartTime, EndTime = x.EndTime });
int rangeCount = 0;
while (ranges.Count() != rangeCount)
{
    rangeCount = ranges.Count();
    ranges = ranges.Select(x => new {
        StartTime = ranges.Where(y => (y.StartTime <= x.StartTime && y.EndTime >= x.StartTime) || (y.StartTime <= x.EndTime && y.EndTime >= x.EndTime)).Min(y => y.StartTime),
        EndTime = ranges.Where(y => (y.StartTime <= x.StartTime && y.EndTime >= x.StartTime) || (y.StartTime <= x.EndTime && y.EndTime >= x.EndTime)).Max(y => y.EndTime),
    }).Distinct().ToList();  // ToList required to avoid recursion issues
}

TimeSpan gapTime = ranges.Max(x => x.EndTime) - ranges.Min(x => x.StartTime) - new TimeSpan(ranges.Sum(x => (x.EndTime - x.StartTime).Ticks));

System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(gapTime);
share|improve this answer
    
if the task1 data is: StartTime=2009-07-28 09:00:00 EndTime=2009-07-28 09:50:00 then the result is wrong. – Mike108 Jul 28 '09 at 14:00
    
I see the problem. With the code above, you would need to recursively calculate the ranges until the ranges couldn't be reduced. Hopefully, I'll have a better version after I can work on it again in a few hours. – John Fisher Jul 28 '09 at 14:27
    
My latest edit added a loop, which recursively merges the ranges until only the appropriate items are left. This should handle whatever data you throw at it. – John Fisher Jul 28 '09 at 16:48
    
It works perfectly. Thank you very much. – Mike108 Jul 29 '09 at 18:05

Pull the interesting records into memory and process them there (by collapsing overlapping ranges into single ranges). The collapsing task is not suitable to querying approaches, such as sql or linqtosql.

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Alright, I've worked out an option that will work.

you can use this:

from a in Tasks
join b in Tasks on true equals true
where a.TaskStartTime < b.TaskFinishTime
where a.TaskFinishTime > b.TaskStartTime
where a.Id < b.Id
select new {
    Id = a.Id,
    User = a.User,
    Task = (a.Task + " + " + b.Task),
    TaskStartTime = (a.TaskStartTime < b.TaskStartTime ? a.TaskStartTime : b.TaskStartTime),
    TaskFinishTime = (a.TaskFinishTime > b.TaskFinishTime ? a.TaskFinishTime : b.TaskFinishTime)
 }

To Collapse Down Individual tasks, until there are no intersections, then just take the sum of All Time, minus the sum of time in all tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I'm waiting for your good news. – Mike108 Jul 28 '09 at 13:42
    
if the task1 is: start=2009-07-28 09:00:00 end=2009-07-28 09:51:00 the result has something wrong. – Mike108 Jul 28 '09 at 14:12
    
this should turn task1 and task2 into something like: 'task1 + task2', '2009-07-28 09:00:00', '2009-07-28 09:45:00'. It does when I try it with LINQPad. – John Gietzen Jul 28 '09 at 14:30
    
I think if the task1 is: start=2009-07-28 09:00:00 end=2009-07-28 09:51:00 then the result should be task1 + task3 and skip task2 – Mike108 Jul 28 '09 at 14:41

Something like this

Suppose you have a collection of task objects:

public class Task
{
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
    public string User { get; set; }
    public string Task { get; set; }
    public DateTime TaskStartTime { get; set; }
    public DateTime TaskFinishTime { get; set; }
}

var tasks = new List<Task> ();
// Fill tasks here...

var idleTimeInMinutes =
    tasks.Last ().TaskFinishTime.Subtract (tasks.First ().TaskStartTime).Minutes
    - tasks.Sum (t => t.TaskFinishTime.Subtract (t.TaskStartTime).Minutes);

EDIT: Now, wait, I see tasks overlap in your example. Then what I wrote is not going to work. I'll have to think about it...

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