Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In the following:

public interface SomeInteface<A, B> {  
    public B doSomething(A a);  
} 

I want to implement a version where the method doSomething returns the parameter a back.
I tried a Holder class;

class Holder<A> {  
     public A value;  
     public(A a){this.value = a;}  
}

and return Holder. However, I am not sure how to define an implementation class of SomeInterface so that I am able to do this.

The following does not even compile:

public class SomeImplementation<X> implements SomeInterface<T> {  

  private class Holder<A> {  
    public A value;  

    public class Holder<A>{  
      public A value;  
      public(A a){this.value = a;}  
    } 
  }   

  class Implementation<A, Holder<A>> implements SomeInterface<A, Holder<A>>{    
    public Holder<A> doSomething(A a){  
      //do stuff      
      return new Holder(a);  
    }   
  }      
}       

What am I messing up here?

share|improve this question
    
What is the compilation error? – unholysampler Aug 13 '12 at 18:00
2  
Why have you got a Holder inner class inside another Holder class? What are these classes adding to the code? Is there a reason you cannot just use the generic class? – RNJ Aug 13 '12 at 18:00
    
@unholysampler:Eclipse shows red the question mark in class Implementation<A, Holder<A>> – Cratylus Aug 13 '12 at 18:01
    
@user846476:Can you give an example of what you mean? – Cratylus Aug 13 '12 at 18:02
1  
It doesn't make sense to specify <A, Holder<A>> as the generic type parameters; you specify the parameter names in the class declaration, the generic type arguments when you actually construct such an object. You'd need something like class Implementation<A, B> implements SomeInterface<A, B>, and then later declare a variable like Implemenation<String, Holder<String>> myImpl = new Implementation<>(); – dlev Aug 13 '12 at 18:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It needs to be

class Implementation<A> implements SomeInteface<A, Holder<A>>{    
          public Holder<A> doSomething(A a){  
              //do stuff  
              return new Holder<A>(a);  
          }     

   } 

In the classname you define the generic variables and their constraints. You don't need a Holder variable.

share|improve this answer
    
1) you're using Holder as a raw type. it should be new Holder<A>(a) 2) "You could also do..." does not compile – newacct Aug 13 '12 at 18:57
    
Yes you are right, I edited the post. – Stephan Aug 13 '12 at 19:39
    
Why use a Holder class at all? See my answer. – herman Aug 14 '12 at 0:29

I don't understand why you make it so difficult. You say

I want to implement a version where the method doSomething returns the parameter a back.

Well, you can do just that:

public class SomeImplementation<A> implements SomeInterface<A, A> {
    public A doSomething(A a) {
        // do stuff
        return a;
    }
}

No need for a Holder class. The interface SomeInterface does not put any constraints on the type parameters, so there's no reason why they can't be the same.

Alternatively, you can allow your implementation to be parameterized with two different types A and B where A extends B (could be useful in some cases):

public class SomeImplementation<A extends B, B> implements SomeInterface<A, B> {
    public B doSomething(A a) {
        // do stuff
        return a;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So SomeInterface<A, A> is the same as SomeInterface<A, B>? – Cratylus Aug 14 '12 at 9:18
    
It's the same interface with different type parameters. – herman Aug 14 '12 at 9:26
    
So the fact that the original declaration was SomeInteface<A,B> does not impose any restriction to the implementing class declaration?Could be Implementation<A,B> or Implementation<A,A> or Implementation<B,B> or Implementation<B,A>? – Cratylus Aug 14 '12 at 9:35
    
Sure, you can even say public class SomeImplementation<X, Y> implements SomeInterface<X, Y> or public class SomeImplementation implements SomeInterface<String, Long>. The A and B in the interface declaration are just names for type parameters. Those names only make sense within that interface, just like names for method arguments don't mean anything outside the method. – herman Aug 14 '12 at 11:46
    
Do you recommend a good resource for this?I keep get confused from time to time on these notations – Cratylus Aug 14 '12 at 11:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.