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Chaining constructors across inheritance in C# is handy and useful. What's the best way to implement similar functionality in C++? This is what I'd like to express:

struct A
{
    A(int p)
    {
        i = p;
    }

    int i;
};

struct B : virtual A
{
    B(int q) : A(q)
    {
    }
};

struct C : virtual B
{
    C(int r) : B(r) // call B::B() which in turn would call A::A()
    {
    }
};

Any ideas?

Cheers, Charlie.

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7  
Aside from the fact that the constructors are inaccessible (i.e., they need to be public or protected, not private), what you have there is valid C++, what, exactly, is the problem you are trying to solve? –  James McNellis Aug 13 '12 at 18:13
1  
It's not part of the syntax to do this in one class. You can, however, chain private non-constructor initializer methods. This is generally used as the substitute. Over inheritence, as you've posted, is fine. –  Wug Aug 13 '12 at 18:15
    
Your code is already essentially correct C++. What's the problem? (You should of course initialize rather than assign i.) –  Kerrek SB Aug 13 '12 at 18:17
    
Changed to structs to fix the accessibility wrinkle –  Charlie Skilbeck Aug 13 '12 at 18:17
1  
@cskilbeck: Do you need virtual inheritance? The default constructor is not needed, but the most derived type will have to explicitly call the constructors of all of the virtual bases: C( int r ): A(r), B(r) {} –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 13 '12 at 18:21
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In C++, virtual inheritance requires the constructor of the most derived type to explicitly call the constructor of all the virtual bases:

C( int r ) : A(r), B(r) {}

While you have clearly stated that you need virtual inheritance, it is uncommon to use virtual inheritance, so you might want to explain the use case. There might be alternatives that don't require this and will thus allow the chaining of the constructors.


In case you wondered by the most derived type needs to call the constructor, the reason is that virtual inheritance means there will be only one such base in the complete object. Now if you consider a possible relation:

struct base { base( int x ); /*...*/ };
struct d1 : virtual base {
   d1() : base(1) {}
// ...
};
struct d2 : virtual base {
   d2() : base(2) {}
// ...
};
struct final : d1, d2 {};

What value should be passed to constructor of the single instance of base inside final? The two different inheritance paths are passing conflicting values, but there is a single object to initialize. Even if the different calls were not conflicting, with a separate compilation model, the compiler cannot know that, so the only option is that the complete object decides how to initialize the virtual bases.

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OK, thanks for this, I'll go and look at the graph and have a tinker –  Charlie Skilbeck Aug 13 '12 at 18:28
    
Right, have straightened out the inheritance and removed virtual which does indeed allow the constructors to chain, thanks! –  Charlie Skilbeck Aug 13 '12 at 18:30
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The most derived class (i.e. C) is responsible for constructing all virtual base classes. So, C can initialize both A and B:

C(int r) : A(r), B(r)

Note that virtual base classes are initialized before any nonvirtual base classes. There is no way to make B initialize the virtual base class A.

You could hack something together, e.g. by making the virtual base A default constructable then giving it an "initialize" method that B can call in its constructor, but doing so may prove hazardous. When the B constructor is called for the B base class subobject, there is no way for it to know whether other base classes of C that derive virtually from A have already been initialized (and potentially have used A already) or that it is the only class that is going to try to initialize A.

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