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In a non-boost project, I have a class which uses a timer based on a certain user action (button pressed/released). I want this class generic, so it takes callbacks for user defined actions.

// TimerClass.h
typedef void (*timerCallback)(void);
...
Class TimerClass : public CButton {
public:
    void setCallbackShortTime(timerCallback clickFn) { shortCallback = clickFn;} ;
    void setCallbackLongTime(timerCallback clickFn) { longCallback = clickFn;} ;
private:
    timerCallback shortCallback, longCallback;
}


// CMyDlg.h
class CMyDlg : public CDialog
{
public:
    void openLiveViewWindow();
    void openAdminPanelWindow();
    TimerClass _buttonSettings;
}

// CMyDlg.cpp
...
_buttonSettings.setCallbackShortTime(&openLiveViewWindow);
...

Now, from another class (DialogClass) I can use the TimerClass but I cannot pass function pointers to the callback functions. These functions are not static. The compiler ends up complaining:

error C2276: '&' : illegal operation on bound member function expression

Some research on this pointed out to std::function() and std::bind() but I'm not familiar with these and would appreciate some pointers on how to resolve this.

RESOLUTION: For anyone interested, here are the bricks of the final solution

// TimedButton.h
#include <functional>
// define timer callback prototype
typedef std::function<void()> timerCallback;
...
class TimedButton : public CButton
{
public:
    TimedButton();
    ...
    void setCallbackShortTime(timerCallback clickFn) { _shortCallback = clickFn;} ;
    void setCallbackLongTime(timerCallback clickFn) { _longCallback = clickFn;} ;
private:
    timerCallback _shortCallback;
    timerCallback _longCallback;
}

// TimedButton.cpp
...
(_longCallback)();  // call long duration fn
...
(_shortCallback)();     // call short duration fn

// in MyDlg.cpp
#include <functional>
...
_buttonSettings.setCallbackShortTime(std::bind(&CMyDlg::openLiveViewWindow, this));
_buttonSettings.setCallbackLongTime(std::bind(&CMyDlg::openAdminPanelWindow, this));
share|improve this question
    
callbacks for member functions behave differently because of the implicit this parameter. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 13 '12 at 18:32
    
Without making the methods static, you'd need to keep a reference to the instance within the timer. Are you using C++11? –  jli Aug 13 '12 at 18:34
    
we're not using C++11, but the previous one as we have the tr1 set of functions –  fduff Aug 13 '12 at 18:42
    
tr1 had the necessary functions for this, so you should be OK on that front. Now if only I could remember how to do this so I could answer your question... –  KRyan Aug 13 '12 at 18:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

std::function is a polymorphic function object, which can wrap up any type of callable object with a particular signature. In your case, you want it to take no arguments and return no value, so you can define:

typedef std::function<void()> timerCallback;

std::bind allows you to adapt a callable object to one of a different signature, by binding arguments to parameters. In your case, you want to adapt a member function by binding it to a particular object to invoke it on:

_buttonSettings.setCallbackShortTime(std::bind(&CMyDlg::openLiveViewWindow, this));

Note that these were introduced in 2011, so older compilers won't support them. In that case, you could either use the very similar Boost or TR1 libraries, or make your own callable class containing a pointer-to-member-function and a pointer/reference to the object you want to invoke it on.

share|improve this answer
    
cheers Mike for pointing me to the right direction. –  fduff Aug 14 '12 at 9:21

The old-fashioned way to do this is to make your callback function accept an additional void* parameter, for which you pass a pointer to the object you wish to call the function on. Then you use a static member function for the callback and let it cast the pointer to the proper object and call your true callback.

typedef void (*timerCallback)(void*);
...
void setCallbackShortTime(timerCallback clickFn, void* object) { shortCallback = clickFn; shortCallbackObject = object;} ;
void setCallbackLongTime(timerCallback clickFn, void* object) { longCallback = clickFn; longCallbackObject = object;} ;
...

static void openLiveViewWindowCallback(void* object) { ((CMyDlg*)object)->openLiveViewWindow(); }
void openLiveViewWindow();
share|improve this answer
    
Is this old-fashioned? <gulp> I've used it frequently! –  acraig5075 Aug 13 '12 at 19:31
    
that's very much a C-like way to do it. The only problem is that the callback needs to know the object type ((CMyDlg*)object)-> which is against the purpose of a generic class. –  fduff Aug 14 '12 at 10:32

You can not pass a pointer to a method of a class, only plain functions. I suggest digging into std::function(), since you are using VS2010, which supports them. There is a nice (and long) tutorial describing them and more here.

share|improve this answer
1  
A little clarification: the problem here is that timerCallback is defined as a pointer to an ordinary function, so you can't store a pointer to member function in it. If it had been defined as a pointer to member function, then you could. But then you'd have to have a this pointer somewhere to call it with. Which is why std::bind is the right answer, as others have said. –  Pete Becker Aug 13 '12 at 20:17
    
Yep, thanks for the clarification. I should have provided such in the first place... :) –  Lyubomir Vasilev Aug 14 '12 at 5:34
    
thanks for the link, very interesting indeed. –  fduff Aug 14 '12 at 9:19

You could create a polymorphic template class that acts as a function pointer.

class TFunctorBase
{
public:
    TFunctorBase(void) {}
    virtual ~TFunctorBase(void) {}
    virtual void operator()(void) = 0;
};

// derived template class
template <class TClass> class TFunctor : public TFunctorBase
{
private:
    void (TClass::*fpt)();   // pointer to member function
    TClass* pt2Object;                  // pointer to object

public:
    TFunctor(TClass* _pt2Object, void(TClass::*_fpt)())
    { pt2Object = _pt2Object; fpt = _fpt;};

    virtual void operator()(void)
    { (*pt2Object.*fpt)();};              // execute member function
};

To initialize a functor object:

TFunctor<MyClass> obj(&myInstance, &MyClass::myMemberFunction);

And to use it:

(*obj)(); 
//(*obj)(42); for operator()(int)

Here's an example:

class ClassA
{
public:
   void function1(int a, string b);
};

ClassA objA;
TFunctor<ClassA> functor(&objA,&ClassA::function);
(*functor)(42, "pumpkin"); //assuming you added virtual void operator()(int, string) to TFunctorBase

Here's a great resource about functors along with the implementation I've described above. http://www.newty.de/fpt/functor.html#chapter4

share|improve this answer
    
Or you could use std::bind, which has several advantages: it's much more powerful, it's in the standard library (starting with C++11) hence more recognizable to future maintainers of your code and more portable, and someone else is responsible for maintaining it. –  Pete Becker Aug 14 '12 at 11:56

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