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I have an assignment where I have to create 3 arrays. The first two arrays have similar elements and the third is empty.

const int arraySize = 4;
array k[arraySize] = {1, 2 ,3, 7}
array j[arraySize] = { 1, 2, 8, 9}
array u;

int *ptr1 = arrayk;
    int *ptr2 = arrayj;

How could I compare the elements in the first two and then copy over those duplicates to the third empty array (array u)?

I was thinking something like this:

for(int i = 0; i < arraySize; ++1) {
    for(int k = 0; k < arraySize; ++k) {
        if(&ptr1[i] == &ptr2[k]) {
            //copy elements that are duplicates to array u
          }
      }
}
share|improve this question
    
I've added the homework tag since you mentioned assignment. – pb2q Aug 13 '12 at 18:58
    
Your thinking looks right. Have you tried it? – KRyan Aug 13 '12 at 18:58
    
Added homework tag for OP mentioning this is an "assignment". – Chris Dargis Aug 13 '12 at 18:59
    
yah i just not sure how to copy the duplicates to the array u. – tensuka Aug 13 '12 at 19:00
    
the other arrays seem sorted. is this always the case? – Gir Aug 13 '12 at 19:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since it looks like homework, I'm assuming you want to do it by yourself not by using a library to achive this. This being the case, your code is fine, you just have to keep an integer variable to store the next available position in u array.

const int arraySize = 4; 
int next = 0; 
array k[arraySize] = {1, 2 ,3, 7};
array j[arraySize] = { 1, 2, 8, 9};
array u[arraySize]; // Because it at most be a copy of array k or j

for(int i = 0; i < arraySize; ++i) {
    for(int k = 0; k < arraySize; ++k) {
        if(arrayk[i] == arrayj[k]) {
            u[next++] = arrayk[i];
        }
    }
}

This way, when you find a duplicate you assign it to the next available position on u and then increase the value of next by one.

Here is the pointer version, although I strongly recommend to avoid them in cases like this, and use them only when they are needed.

const int arraySize = 4; 
int next = 0; 
array k[arraySize] = {1, 2 ,3, 7};
array j[arraySize] = { 1, 2, 8, 9};
array u[arraySize]; // Because it at most be a copy of array k or j

int *ptr1 = arrayk;
int *ptr2 = arrayj;

for(int i = 0; i < arraySize; ++i) {
    for(int k = 0; k < arraySize; ++k) {
        if(*(ptr1 + i)  == *(ptr2 + k) {
            u[next++] = *(ptr1 + i);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This has O(n^2) complexity, rather than O(n log n) that can be obtained with sorting both ranges and doing set_intersection. – TemplateRex Aug 13 '12 at 19:11
    
ok this seems very reasonable but can you see my re-edit with the pointers. how can i re-incorporate what you just added with my pointers? – tensuka Aug 13 '12 at 19:12
    
@rhalbersma I agree, but this does't lool like he needs the best code to do it, he needs to learn about arrays and how to use them. – Topo Aug 13 '12 at 19:14
    
@AjMunot Do you need to use the pointers? Because I think you should avoid them when not necessary. – Topo Aug 13 '12 at 19:16
    
exactly topo.. i added some pointers in my original post if you could take a look – tensuka Aug 13 '12 at 19:16

If you can use the STL, I recommend set_intersection. Here is the example used in this link:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main () {
  int first[] = {5,10,15,20,25};
  int second[] = {50,40,30,20,10};
  vector<int> v(10);                           // 0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
  vector<int>::iterator it;

  sort (first,first+5);     //  5 10 15 20 25
  sort (second,second+5);   // 10 20 30 40 50

  it=set_intersection (first, first+5, second, second+5, v.begin());
                                               // 10 20 0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0

  cout << "intersection has " << int(it - v.begin()) << " elements.\n";

  return 0;
}

If you can't use the STL, consider this code (also from the link).

The behavior of this function template is equivalent to:

template <class InputIterator1, class InputIterator2, class OutputIterator>
  OutputIterator set_intersection ( InputIterator1 first1, InputIterator1 last1,
                                    InputIterator2 first2, InputIterator2 last2,
                                    OutputIterator result )
{
  while (first1!=last1 && first2!=last2)
  {
    if (*first1<*first2) ++first1;
    else if (*first2<*first1) ++first2;
    else { *result++ = *first1++; first2++; }
  }
  return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
not allowed to really use STLs. this is intro to c++ stuff. However the third array is mentioned to be 1-D and empty – tensuka Aug 13 '12 at 19:02
    
Using 5 as a magic number is kind of a bad practice. Using #DEFINE for that would make sense. – KRyan Aug 13 '12 at 19:02
    
I am allowed to use pointers – tensuka Aug 13 '12 at 19:03
    
@AjMunot Look at the link, and look at the "equivalent code" portion. I will add that to my answer. – kevlar1818 Aug 13 '12 at 19:04
2  
Another note: pre-conditions for std::set_intersection are that both input ranges are sorted. Still the general case of doing two sorts + the intersection is O(n log n), rather than the OP's O(n^2) algorithm. – TemplateRex Aug 13 '12 at 19:09

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