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I'm really not that good at CSS, and I want to know how to correctly style a form in a manner that it puts each single text input and label in a line. like this :

<label for="input1">...</label>
<input type="text" id="input1"/>
<label for="input2">...</label>
<input type="text" id="input2"/>
<label for="input3">...</label>
<input type="text" id="input3"/>
<label for="input3">...</label>
<input type="text" id="input3"/>

and it would be shown in the webpage like :

(label)(input)
(label)(input)
(label)(input)
(label)(input)
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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I recommend this tutorial by A List Apart about Prettier Accessible Forms. You can also use a definition list with some custom styling, e.g.,

<dl><dt><label></label></dt>
  <dd><input></dd></dl>

And something like:

dl dt {
    float: left;
    width: 8em;
}

Edit: to sum up the A List Apart article, they suggest you put form fields in an ordered list ol. Labels are displayed as inline-block so they appear horizontally next to their associated fields.

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I don't understand. putting form elements in definition list is kind of non semantic. –  Anubhav Saini Aug 13 '12 at 19:42
1  
I'm marking this as an answer because of the link provided, it helped a lot. Thanks. –  Rafael Adel Aug 13 '12 at 22:14
<label>foo</label>
<input type="text"/>
<label>foo</label>
<input type="text"/>​

<style>
input, label { float:left  }
label { clear:left; }
</style>

http://jsfiddle.net/RpRS5/

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1  
I believe this is the best way to get this. +1 –  maksbd19 Aug 15 '12 at 19:56

Put your inputs inside the label element and then you can simply display: block them or float them, I prefer display but it would be easy enough to change.

<label>Hello <input type="radio" name="what" value="Hello" /></label>

http://jsfiddle.net/Bpxfp/

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But isn't this a bad practice ? –  Rafael Adel Aug 13 '12 at 19:17
    
@Rafael "this"? What are you referring to? –  TheZ Aug 13 '12 at 19:18
    
Putting inputs inside label tags. –  Rafael Adel Aug 13 '12 at 19:18
1  
@Rafael The w3c demonstrates this usage and calls it "implicitly associated" w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html#h-17.9 –  TheZ Aug 13 '12 at 19:29
    
+1 man! didn't even read your answer. Crap. now I feel bad. –  Anubhav Saini Aug 13 '12 at 19:48

Put them in a list, or in a structure like a list (that is to say, wrap each "row" in a div).

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this should have been a comment. –  Anubhav Saini Aug 13 '12 at 19:47
    
@AnubhavSaini How so? It's a complete solution. –  Marcin Aug 13 '12 at 19:48

I find enclosing label and input or select tags in a div or list. And the label and select tags should be of type inline-block

<div>
    <label>Name: </label><input type="text" />
</div>

<div>
    <label>Place: </label><input type="text" />
</div>

CSS:

label {
    display: inline-block;
}
input {
    display: inline-block;
    padding: 2px;
}
div {
    display: block;
    margin: 2px 0;
}

This would work out well.

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http://jsfiddle.net/ud7YE/1/

you can control the space between the label and input by varying the width of the wrapper. Just set the height of the label and the top margin of the input same in value but negative

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1  
one good way to solve. but floating and margin-lizing is bad for code maintainability –  Anubhav Saini Aug 13 '12 at 19:46

http://jsfiddle.net/iamanubhavsaini/rzTvS/

There are many ways to do so, one given by Xander is okay. Here's another one.

<label>Name: <input type="text" /></label>
<label>Name: <input type="text" /></label>
<label>Name: <input type="text" /></label>
<label>Name: <input type="text" /></label>
<label>Name: <input type="text" /></label>

​ with css code:

label{
   display:block;
   height:40px;
   padding:3px;
   margin:2px;
}

input[type=text]{
    height:28px;
    border-radius:3px;
    width:200px;
}
​

Head to the above given link to see the rendered visual.

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Pixel-specific widths and heights are probably a bad idea. I would not set the height at all, and instead set widths in ems or percentages. –  Sarah Vessels Aug 13 '12 at 19:29
1  
    
@SarahVessels this is just to show quickly: "what can be achieved". Anyway, valid concern. I myself use ems. –  Anubhav Saini Aug 13 '12 at 19:33
    
w3.org/TR/WCAG-TECHS/H44. –  Anubhav Saini Aug 13 '12 at 19:43

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