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A simplification of my dictionary:

my_dict = {
    'DOC': [
        [('k', 'v'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k2', 'v2'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k4', 'v4')],
        [('k5', 'v5'), ('k', 'v'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k6', 'v6')]
    ],
    'DIC': [
        [('k7', 'v7'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k8', 'v8')],
        [('k5', 'v5'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k2', 'v2')],
        [('k4', 'v4'), ('k9', 'v9')]
    ],
    'INFRA': [
        [('k5', 'v5'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k2', 'v2')],
        [('k', 'v'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k2', 'v2'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k4', 'v4')]
    ]
}

Overwriting my dictionary values:

for k, v in my_dict.items():
     my_dict[k] = map(lambda x: dict(x), my_dict[k])

Returning...

my_dict 
{'DIC': [{'k3': 'v3', 'k7': 'v7', 'k8': 'v8'},
         {'k1': 'v1', 'k2': 'v2', 'k3': 'v3', 'k5': 'v5'},
         {'k4': 'v4', 'k9': 'v9'}],
 'DOC': [{'k': 'v', 'k1': 'v1', 'k2': 'v2', 'k3': 'v3', 'k4': 'v4'},
         {'k': 'v', 'k1': 'v1', 'k5': 'v5', 'k6': 'v6'}],
 'INFRA': [{'k1': 'v1', 'k2': 'v2', 'k3': 'v3', 'k5': 'v5'},
           {'k': 'v', 'k1': 'v1', 'k2': 'v2', 'k3': 'v3', 'k4': 'v4'}]}

When I ran my real code following the same logic I got the error:

ValueError: dictionary update sequence element #0 has length 6; 2 is required

I've tried to create another dictionary to receive the map() but the same error occurred. Someone could help me?

share|improve this question
2  
Your code runs fine for me. Can you show an example that causes the ValueError? –  Jon-Eric Aug 13 '12 at 19:31
1  
It's really hard to find bugs in code you can't see. :( –  Jason Orendorff Aug 13 '12 at 19:32
1  
Aside: {k: map(dict,v) for k,v in my_dict.iteritems()} is a little simpler (2.7; .items() in 3). The lambda is unnecessary and you're not using v even though you extract it. –  DSM Aug 13 '12 at 19:42
    
Replace your lambda with a regular function which prints its argument before returning dict(x) and note the last thing printed before the error. –  martineau Aug 13 '12 at 20:49
1  
@Jason Orendorff: The problem seems more likely in the data we can't see. –  martineau Aug 13 '12 at 22:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The dict constructor expects a sequence of 2 item subsequences (lists or tuples). At least one of subsequences contains more then two items.

Perhaps you have missing comma (see last item):

>>> dict([('1', 'red'),('2', 'blue'),('3' 'purple')]) # missing comma in last item
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#166>", line 1, in <module>
    dict([('1', 'red'),('2', 'blue'),('3' 'purple')]) 
ValueError: dictionary update sequence element #2 has length 7; 2 is required

Or maybe a single item instead of a tuple (again, see last item)

>>> dict([('1', 'red'),('2', 'blue'),('purple')]) # last "tuple" has one item
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#167>", line 1, in <module>
    dict([('1', 'red'),('2', 'blue'),('purple')])
ValueError: dictionary update sequence element #2 has length 6; 2 is required
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting example, but I checked my tuples and not noticed the absence of commas or a single term. I have things like (u'vesti\xe1rio', None), but it's running on ipython. –  Eduardo Carvalho Aug 13 '12 at 20:53
1  
@user1596206: You may not have noticed an issue, but the issue exists. Python's error message is telling the truth. Try running the diagnostic that phihag has written for you. I think it will make your invisible error visible. –  Steven Rumbalski Aug 13 '12 at 21:17
1  
@ Steven Rumbalski: The error message was really telling the truth. The code proposed by phihag was very useful to me, returning ValueError: In 'DOCENTE': value is not a tuple(2), but u'quadro'. So, I could detect my error occurred before and it was not related with the overwriting of python dictionary values. Thank you very much and sorry if the question does not proceed. –  Eduardo Carvalho Aug 13 '12 at 23:16

The input in the real testcase doesn't conform to the structure you expect. In particular, instead of all being tuples, at least one of the elements is a sequence of length 6. For example, a faulty input may look like:

{'DOC': [
    [('123456')],               # A string is a sequence, too
    [('123' '456')]             # Note the lack of a comma
    [('1','2','3','4','5','6')] # A tuple, but with 6 elements
    [['1','2','3','4','5','6']] # A list
]}

To solve this problem, check your input, like:

for k, v in my_dict.items():
    for l in v:
        for subl in v:
            for tup in subl:
                if not len(tup) == 2:
                    raise ValueError('In %r: value is not a tuple(2), but %r'
                                     % (k, tup))

Oh, by the way, when designing data structures, it's often a good idea to follow the Zen of Python, which includes:

Flat is better than nested.

share|improve this answer
    
I've used the proposed code but there isn't a sequence of 6 elements in my real tuples. –  Eduardo Carvalho Aug 13 '12 at 20:12
    
Can you simplify your real tuples until you get an input that you can show to us, but that still fails? –  phihag Aug 13 '12 at 20:21
1  
@user1596206: Is it possible that you are missing a comma in one of your tuples? ('18', 'blue') becomes a single six item string if you forget the comma because Python implicitly concatenates two adjacent strings. –  Steven Rumbalski Aug 13 '12 at 20:29
    
@StevenRumbalski Excellent example, that's probably it. Added it to this answer, and +1 to yours. –  phihag Aug 13 '12 at 20:33

The problem is that in your "real code", the first element of one of your lists has more than two elements (6). dict requires exactly two to interpret them as key, value.

Here's an example that generates the error you describe:

my_dict = {
    'DOC': [
        [('k', 'v', 'extra1', 'extra2', 'extra3', 'extra4'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k2', 'v2'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k4', 'v4')],
        [('k5', 'v5'), ('k', 'v'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k6', 'v6')]
    ],
    'DIC': [
        [('k7', 'v7'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k8', 'v8')],
        [('k5', 'v5'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k2', 'v2')],
        [('k4', 'v4'), ('k9', 'v9')]
    ],
    'INFRA': [
        [('k5', 'v5'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k2', 'v2')],
        [('k', 'v'), ('k1', 'v1'), ('k2', 'v2'), ('k3', 'v3'), ('k4', 'v4')]
    ]
}

Here's a simple way to drop in a print statement to see the problem element:

for k, v in my_dict.items():

    # Print out the first element of each list,
    # because one of them has six elements when it should only have two.
    for l in my_dict[k]:
        print l[0]

    my_dict[k] = map(lambda x: dict(x), my_dict[k])
share|improve this answer

I can see no problem with code and data in your question. Assuming there's nothing significantly different about the "real" code, you could do something like this to find out what the malformed data is that causes the error to occur:

def test(x):
    print x
    return dict(x)

for k, v in my_dict.items():
#     my_dict[k] = map(lambda x: dict(x), my_dict[k])
     my_dict[k] = map(test, my_dict[k])
share|improve this answer

How about this code which is simpler than yours:

temp_dict = {}
for k in my_dict():
    temp_dict[k] = {}
    for t in my_dict[k]:
        temp_dict[k][t[0]] = t[1]
my_dict = temp_dec
del temp_dec
share|improve this answer
    
-1 This would just mask the problem. And wrong data is usually way worse than an error. –  phihag Aug 13 '12 at 20:17

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