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Let us have the followig class

class Animal
{
  public: 
    virtual short getFeet() = 0;
    virtual void setFeet(short feet) = 0;
};

and 2 derived classes:

class Bird : public Animal
{
    short flying_speed; 
  public:
    virtual short getFeet() { return 2; }  // always 2 feet
    virtual void setFeet(short feet_) { };
    virtual short getFlyingSpeed() { return flying_speed; }
};

class Mammal : public Animal 
{
    short feet; // whale: 0 feet, human: 2 feet, others: 4 feet
  public:
    virtual short getFeet() { return feets; }
    virtual void setFeet(short feet_) { feet = feet_ };
};

A) A question related to the object model:

Let us focus on property feets. What to do with the atribute feet and methods getFeet() and setFeet().

Some animals belonging to the same category have different amount of feet, so they use an attribute feet and methods getFeet() and setFeet() are common.

Some animals have the same amount of feet, so they do not use an own attribute feet. The method getFeet() returns a constant, the method setFeet() does not do anything.

Is this model correct or any changes related to the variable feet are recommended (there are a lot of animals without feets)?

B) A question related to the polymorphism

One category has some specific feature; for example birds, which are flying. So it makes sense to ask at what speed they are flying, see the method getFlyingSpeed().

We would like to use a polymorphism and create a pointer pointing to a Bird:

int main(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Animal *a = new Bird();
    std:: cout << a->getFlyingSpeed() << '\t'; // error!
}

I supposed, that the compiler checks a correct assignment not during a compilation, but there is only a runtime check of both types. But I was wrong because...

Error C2039: getFlyingSpeed : is not a member of Animal

Is there any way, how to use an attribute, which is not common to all classes, together with a polymorphism? Or can only runtime type chcek will be forced?

Maybe this model is not correct. How to redesing it?

Thanks for your help.

share|improve this question
    
for A:dont see any problems. if all animals had feet i would put the feet variable in the animal base class. for B - try dynamic_cast, if it fails it cant fly, if it succeeds - call the function –  Gir Aug 13 '12 at 19:29
    
dolphins dont have feet :( –  Gir Aug 13 '12 at 19:32
1  
@Gir: Dolphins have 4 feet. ;-) –  stakx Aug 13 '12 at 19:32
4  
It would be cruel to change an animal's number of feet at runtime (i.e. setFeet()) –  Emile Cormier Aug 13 '12 at 19:43
1  
Requesting PETA into this thread –  Roman Saveljev Aug 13 '12 at 20:02

7 Answers 7

Animal *a = new Bird();

The assignment is correct; Bird is derived from Animal, so a Bird* can be stored in an Animal*. But the type of the pointer a is pointer to Animal, not pointer to Bird, so you can only call member functions that are defined for Animal. That's why the compiler objects to

a->getFlyingSpeed()

getFlyingSpeed is not a member function of Animal. On the other hand, the call

a->getFeet()

is okay, because getFeet is a member function of Animal. It will call the version of getFeet that's defined in Bird, because Bird is the type of the object that a points to.

In short, C++ is statically typed; that is, types are determined at compile time, which is why you can only call Animal member functions on a.

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A)

Public exposure of setFeet() looks weird (well, lets say this is amateur surgeon sandbox), but I would recommend redesigning object hierarchy as follows:

class Animal
{
public:
    virtual short getFeet() const = 0;
}

class SurgeonDelight : public Animal
{
    short feetNumber;
public:
    short getFeet() const {return feetNumber;}
    virtual void setFeet(short feet) {feetNumber = feet;}
}

Then you inherit all animals with constant number of feet from Animal, all others from SurgeonDelight. We make setFeet virtual for its descendants to be able implementing some side effects of changing number of feet. SurgeonDelight hides actual data member to enforce "single reason to change" thing.

B)

You can employ RTTI and dynamic_cast, but basically you should construct Bird to be a Bird

Somebody told me "your design is bad, if you have to do dynamic_cast". I tend to agree. I coded for over 5 years and did not use dynamic_cast for a single time (because we did not support it). If there are more animals in your zoo with flying speed (like Turtle) you should inject additional layers of generalization into your hierarchy.

Another not so nice approach I saw in few libraries is to leave "extension" API:

virtual void* extension(int functionId, int param) = 0;

Yep, quite ugly, but gets you there

share|improve this answer
    
In a used model it is not possible to enure Bird to be a bird. There is a cotainer of Animals. I pop a pointer and have to decide, what can I do with an animal... –  justik Aug 13 '12 at 20:38
    
@justik Then I would follow Edward Bono's approach from "Serious Creativity" and asked myself "why is this not possible?". This could open you new horizons. I seriously think your constraint is redundant. Or you could go as Thomas L Holaday suggested and extend base class with all possible API's –  Roman Saveljev Aug 13 '12 at 21:01
    
@ Roman: My constraint follows the fact that I did not do this model. Animal example represents only transferring of the model to some simple example. –  justik Aug 13 '12 at 21:08

Your call animal should only provide features which are common to all animals (or the animals you wnat to use in you application). For other features not common to all animals can use multiple inheritance to implement the desired behaviour for sub types of animals. So a subtype might be FlyingAnimals.

class FlyingAnimal
{
  public: 
    virtual short getFlyingSpeed() = 0;
    virtual ~FlyingAnimal(){}

};


class Bird : public Animal, public FlyingAnimal
{
    short flying_speed; 
  public:
    virtual short getFeet() { return 2; }  // always 2 feet
    virtual void setFeet(short feet_) { };
    virtual short getFlyingSpeed() { return flying_speed; }
};

You can define also a subclasses for animals with feets and so on.

Or instead of multiple inheritance you can build it like that:

class FlyingAnimal: public Animal
{
  public: 
    virtual short getFlyingSpeed() = 0;
    virtual ~FlyingAnimal(){}

};


class Bird : public FlyingAnimal
{
    short flying_speed; 
  public:
    virtual short getFeet() { return 2; }  // always 2 feet
    virtual void setFeet(short feet_) { };
    virtual short getFlyingSpeed() { return flying_speed; }
};

In your main method however you need to define what type of animal you suspect.

int main(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    FlyingAnimal *a = new Bird();
    std:: cout << a->getFlyingSpeed() << '\t'; // not an error anymore!
}
share|improve this answer

This is a rich topic. Consider this brutal solution:

struct FlyingSpeed {
  bool meaningful;
  short speed;
  static const FlyingSpeed nofly; 
};

const FlyingSpeed FlyingSpeed::nofly = { false, 0 };

If the flying_speed method returned an object of type FlyingSpeed instead of a short. each instance of Animal could respond to the getFlyingSpeed method by returning a FlyingSpeed object. Birds, bats, bees would have a meaningful FlyingSpeed. Worms, wolves, walruses would have a non-meaningful FlyingSpeed. Kangaroos could have a flying speed or not depending on your view of hopping. Spiders would have a meaningful FlyingSpeed while balooning, and a non-meaningful FlyingSpeed once they build their webs.

The class object nofly is a convenience so that terrestrial, arborial, and aquatic animals can have terse constructors.

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A) I suppose all animals cannot change the number of feet once they are created, unless you really want to allow this. Therefore, it is best to define feet in the constructors of Animal and removing the associated setter. Subclasses of Animal can then call the base constructor without a problem. I wouldn't find dedicating a class for animals with feet worthwhile, since it usually makes sense to indicate an animal has no feet at all.

B) What has been suggested is the most appropriate: create an interface class (with purely virtual methods) for flying animals. Calling it FlyingAnimal, you can use a FlyingAnimal* pointer to call your method. If you want to know if an animal can fly in runtime, a bool canFly() method can be used, thus making a dynamic cast safe.

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There are a few things wrong here.

First, it doesn't make sense that the property feet can even be changed during the lifetime of an Animal instance. Even if humans have 2 feet, they cannot suddenly grow a third or a 77th one. Also, it probably should be the same across all instances of the same animal type. So feet ought to be fixed per class, not be settable per instance.

Try this:

class Animal
{
  private:
    short _feet;
  protected:
    Animal(short feet) : _feet(feet) { }
  public:
    short getFeet() { return _feet; }  // and call it 'getNumberOfFeet`; see below.
                                       // note: no longer virtual!
};

class Whale : public Animal
{
  public:
    Whale() : Animal(0) { }
};

class Mammal : public Animal { … };

class Ape : public Mammal
{
  public:
    Ape() : Animal(2) { }
};

(Sorry if there are a few errors. My C++ skills are a little rusty these days.)

Note also that I set the number of feet for all apes to 4. This is because if you derived a class Human from Ape (let's assume that we all believe in the theory of evolution...), and Ape had 4 feet, would it make sense to contradict this by saying that humans only had 2? Something would be wrong in your type hierarchy, because Humans obviously wouldn't be proper Apes.

Btw., it would make more sense if your property were called numberOfFeet, not feet. With feet, you'd expect to get back a std::vector<Foot> or something similar. After all, when someone says to you, "Give me your feet", you would put your legs in their lap or something, but you wouldn't say, "Two!"... would you?


Second, to your code example:

int main(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Animal *a = new Bird();
    std:: cout << a->getFlyingSpeed() << '\t'; // error!
}

Two possibilities:

  • You always know that a refers to a Bird. Then why do you declare variable a as Animal* instead of as Bird*?

  • a may or may not refer to a Bird. Then why do you call a->getFlyingSpeed()? What should happen if a is not a Bird instance?

One possible solution:

class Animal
{
  public:
    void explainYourself() = 0;
};

class Bird : public Animal
{
    …
  public:
    void explainYourself()
    {
        std::cout << "I am flying at " << getFlyingSpeed() << " mph." << std::endl;
    }

};

class Mammal : public Animal
{
    …
  public:
    void explainYourself()
    {
        std::cout << "Hello, I have " << getFeet() << " feet." << std::endl;
    }
};


int main(…)
{
    Animal *a = new Bird();
    a->explainYourself();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
setFeet() - I think this is just poor conversion of OP's real code –  Roman Saveljev Aug 13 '12 at 19:49
    
@Roman: Pardon me... what do you mean? –  stakx Aug 13 '12 at 19:53
    
I mean that I think justik works on different code, which he can not show us, and mocked up the same problem within this funky example. Well, not really important. Off-topic is over now –  Roman Saveljev Aug 13 '12 at 19:56
    
This might be so, but since we cannot work or comment on what we don't see, I am taking his example code seriously, whether it is the actual code or only a mock-up. –  stakx Aug 13 '12 at 20:00

You could check which type it is at runtime with dynamic_cast:

void tryFlying(Animal *a) {
    Bird *b = dynamic_cast<Bird *>(a);
    if (b) {
        std::cout << "uninitialized speed junk " << b->getFlyingSpeed() << std::endl;
    } else {
        std::cout << "can't fly" << std::endl;
    }
}

int main() {
    Animal *a, *b;
    a = new Bird;
    b = new Mammal;
    tryFlying(a);
    tryFlying(b);
    return 0;
}

Output:

 uninitialized speed junk -27757
 can't fly

Comes with a free memory leak (needs virtual destructors).

share|improve this answer
    
I suppose this would work, but speaking of polymorphism, it isn't exactly the best, most extensible approach... –  stakx Aug 13 '12 at 19:58

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