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In the case that a a repository has a number of branches: How does one simply update a file across all the branches.

In this case it's a bashrc like file that specifies some environments variables. I have in the past updated the master branch version then rebased each branch. This has a sort of n+1 overhead, I'd like to avoid.

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You can't. Script it, by visiting each branch in turn, and changing (or copying from somewhere) the file on them. You can avoid the checking out by taking precisely the same Git object you committed on the first (working? master?) branch, if it is ok take precisely the same content of the file. –  fork0 Aug 13 '12 at 19:32
    
I think it would be better to script the rebasing. Overhead is the same whether you rebase or copy the file in each branch. So why not have a clean history without duplicated messages and changesets? –  Marcin Koziński Aug 14 '12 at 6:14
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1 Answer

To extend fork0's comment, you need to combine:

Ie:

#!/bin/bash
branches=()
eval "$(git for-each-ref --shell --format='branches+=(%(refname))' refs/heads/)"
for branch in "${branches[@]}"; do
  if [[ "${branch}" != "master" ]]; then
    git checkout ${branch}
    git checkout master -- yourFile        
  fi
done

(This is be adapted to your case, since here it always checkout the file from the master branch.)

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