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Problem:
Given is Table with the following structure:

Table:  ID, ID_POINTER, DATA

I want to query a chained data sequence in this Table.
How do I query most fast the following "slow" query:

SELECT * FROM Table 1, ...., Table n WHERE
Table 1.ID = TABLE 2.ID_POINTER and .........  and TABLE n-1.ID = Table n.ID_POINTER
and Table 1.DATA = wish data 1  AND .......... AND Table n.DATA = wish data n

?

My Question:
Is it efficient to replace Table , Table by Table INNER JOIN Table?

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1  
You should use proper JOIN syntax in your queries. However, this probably does not affect the performance, unless you made a mistake in the WHERE clause. –  Gordon Linoff Aug 13 '12 at 20:11
    
So it will make a difference, if I permute among all WHERE conditions. Lets say, if I start with "TABLE 1. DATA = wish data 1" and so on. –  Ewrt Wert Aug 13 '12 at 20:15

2 Answers 2

First, rewrite the query to use proper join syntax. The "," means "cross join" and is a very expensive operation (or, sometimes worse, can result in no rows if one of the tables is empty).

When using ",", it is very easy to make a mistake in the where clause, having bad performance consequences.

Second, the query optimizers should be choosing the best join path. However, to do this requires having updated statistics on the tables. So, be sure that you have updated statistics (this varies greatly by database).

Third, you should always mention the database being used, especially for optimization.

And, finally, such queries are usually -- but not always -- faster by having indexes on the join columns. This is especially true when you have a filter that selects a small subset of all the rows.

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Ok. Then I will try it with left join. --- It is MySQL. --- "having indexes on the join columns." ?? –  Ewrt Wert Aug 13 '12 at 20:24
1  
@EwrtWert - Except that the WHERE clause conditions indicate that you've actually got an INNER join (logically, if not actually), not a left one. You are unlikely to get correct (expected) behavior with a LEFT join - just use a regular one. –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 13 '12 at 21:11
    
@x-zero -- ok, then I use INNER JOIN. I am not familiar with the JOIN operations yet. Cartesian product is clear for me. But will JOIN be faster? Or would it be enough to sort the where conditions and tables properly. The basic problem is, that I do not know how MySQL answers the query. –  Ewrt Wert Aug 14 '12 at 9:14
    
@Ewrt - A(n) (INNER) JOIN is faster only in that it tells the system to restrict the rows in some fashion, decreasing the amount of work that needs to be performed (this presumes, of course, that it's able to determine which rows it needs efficiently, which usually requires indices). JOINs are part of basic SQL operations - you may want to grab a book (for basic concept stuff, a general one will do, of any age - only bother to get recent ones for database-specific stuff). –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 14 '12 at 15:35
    
@x-zero -- Thanks. I will rebuild the query by using join operations. I will see if it gets faster. I will post the result. -- When I will find the time I will try to learn more about the theoretics behind join and its effect on performance. –  Ewrt Wert Aug 19 '12 at 16:54

I think you need somthing like this SQLFIDDLE

SELECT ID ,@pv:=ID_POINTER AS IDP, DATA FROM test
JOIN
(SELECT @pv:=1)tmp
WHERE ID=@pv

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `test` (
  `ID` int(8) unsigned NOT NULL ,
  `ID_POINTER` int(8) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `DATA` varchar(128)  NOT NULL
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1  ;

INSERT INTO `test` VALUES(1,2,"data1"),
(2,3,"data2"),
(3,4,"data3"),
(4,5,"data4"),
(5,11,"data5"),
(8,9,"data6"),
(9,10,"data7");

Result: For id = 1( Retrieving a chained data for the id 1 set @pv:=1 in query)

ID  IDP DATA
1   2   data1
2   3   data2
3   4   data3
4   5   data4
5   11  data5

For id = 8( Retrieving a chained data for the id 8 set @pv:=8 in query)

SELECT ID ,@pv:=ID_POINTER AS IDP, DATA FROM test
JOIN
(SELECT @pv:=8)tmp
WHERE ID=@pv

Result:

ID  IDP DATA
8   9   data6
9   10  data7
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