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I have a table that looks like this.

| path_id | step | point_id | delay_time | stand_time | access |

| 202 | 1 | 111 | 0 | 0 | 7 |

Which lists point_id's in step order. E.g.: 111 - step 1, 181 - step 2, etc.

I need to write a query that would take point_id, select ALL values which have higher step within ALL path_id's that have a given value and return a grouped set of point_id's.

I am currently using this query

SELECT DISTINCT `pdb`.`point_id` AS `id` 
FROM `path_detail` AS `pda` INNER JOIN 
`path_detail` AS `pdb` ON pda.path_id = pdb.path_id 
 AND pda.step < pdb.step
WHERE 
(pda.point_id = 111) 
GROUP BY `pdb`.`path_id`

Which doesn't seem to work too reliably.

Any suggestions?

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1  
"I need to write a query that would take point_id, select ALL values which have higher step within ALL path_id's that have a given value and return a grouped set of point_id's." Err... what? Can you demonstrate with a worked example? –  Mark Byers Aug 13 '12 at 20:28
    
What do you mean by it doesn't work reliably? Can you show schema for both tables in question? Can you show sample output you would like to see? –  Mike Brant Aug 13 '12 at 20:29
    
Aite, I'll try to elaborate. Let's say I pass a point_id that has a step value of 10, within path_id 202. Thus I need steps 11 and onwards selected from rows with path_id of 202. Then, I'll need to check the rows with path_id of 203, 204 and so on, returning a distinct set of values. In a more real-world example, I'm passing a city id, expecting to find all cities that the transport will arrive to after it. As far as the query I provided goes - I'm quite certain it only return one value per path_id, while there can be multiple ones. –  user1596391 Aug 13 '12 at 20:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try:

SELECT Distinct `pdb`.`point_id` AS `id` 
FROM `path_detail` AS `pda`, `path_detail` AS `pdb`  
WHERE 
pda.point_id = 111
AND pda.path_id = pdb.path_id 
AND pda.step < pdb.step
Order by `pdb`.`point_id` ASC
share|improve this answer
    
DISTINCT really should be there, otherwise I get more than 5000 rows fetched. Seems to work otherwise, thanks. –  user1596391 Aug 13 '12 at 20:50

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