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I have checked all of the other questions with the same error yet found no helpful solution =/

I have a dictionary of lists:

d = {'a': [1], 'b': [1, 2], 'c': [], 'd':[]}

in which some of the values are empty. At the end of creating these lists, I want to remove these empty lists before returning my dictionary. Current I am attempting to do this as follows:

for i in d:
    if not d[i]:
        d.pop(i)

however, this is giving me the runtime error. I am aware that you cannot add/remove elements in a dictionary while iterating through it...what would be a way around this then?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 30 down vote accepted

In Python 2.x calling keys makes a copy of the key that you can iterate over while modifying the dict:

for i in d.keys():

Note that this doesn't work in Python 3.x because keys returns an iterator instead of a list.

Another way is to use list to force a copy of the keys to be made. This one also works in Python 3.x:

for i in list(d):
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Just use dictionary comprehension to copy the relevant items into a new dict

>>> d
{'a': [1], 'c': [], 'b': [1, 2], 'd': []}
>>> d = { k : v for k,v in d.iteritems() if v}
>>> d
{'a': [1], 'b': [1, 2]}
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I would try to avoid inserting empty lists in the first place, but, would generally use:

d = {k: v for k,v in d.iteritems() if v} # re-bind to non-empty

If prior to 2.7:

d = dict( (k, v) for k,v in d.iteritems() if v )

or just:

empty_key_vals = list(k for k in k,v in d.iteritems() if v)
for k in empty_key_vals:
    del[k]
share|improve this answer
    
+1: last option is interesting because it only copies the keys of those items that need deleting. This may give better performance if only a small number of items need deleting relative to the size of the dict. –  Mark Byers Aug 13 '12 at 20:45
    
@MarkByers yup - and if a large number do, then re-binding the dict to a new one that's filtered is a better option. It's always the expectation of how the structure should work –  Jon Clements Aug 13 '12 at 20:50
    
One danger with rebinding is if somewhere in the program there was an object that held a reference to the old dict it wouldn't see the changes. If you're certain that's not the case, then sure... that's a reasonable approach, but it's important to understand that it's not quite the same as modifying the original dict. –  Mark Byers Aug 13 '12 at 20:53
    
@MarkByers extremely good point - You and I know that (and countless others), but it's not obvious to all. And I'll put money on the table it hasn't also bitten you in the rear :) –  Jon Clements Aug 13 '12 at 21:06

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