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I am fairly new to c++ and am wondering why my array keeps getting corrupted. It goes through the double for loops several times before corrupting ammo_bank, although it is properly assigned before that line. It then gives me the error writing violation

class bullet{
public:
    int x, y, damage, speed;
    char direction;
};

bullet * ammo_bank[100];
void render(player avatar, riflemen enemy){
    bullet projectile;
    int counter1, counter2, icurrentammo;
    icurrentammo = current_ammo -1;
    for (counter1 = 0; counter1 <=SCREEN_HEIGHT; counter1++){
        for (counter2 = 0; counter2 <=SCREEN_WIDTH; counter2++){     // corruption occurs a few times before here
            screen[counter1][counter2] = '.';
        }
    }
    system("cls");
    screen [avatar.y][avatar.x] = AVATAR_SYMBOL;
    screen [enemy.y][enemy.x] = RIFLEMEN_SYMBOL;
    while (icurrentammo >= 0){
        projectile = *ammo_bank[icurrentammo];                 // Writing error
        screen[projectile.x][projectile.y] = BULLET_SYMBOL;
        projectile.x ++;
        icurrentammo --;
    }

    for (counter1 = 0; counter1 <=SCREEN_HEIGHT; counter1++){
        cout << endl;
        for (counter2 = 0; counter2 <=SCREEN_WIDTH; counter2++){
            cout << screen[counter1][counter2];
        }
    }


void playerShoot(player avatar){
    ammo_bank[current_ammo] = new bullet(); // Create the MyClass here.
    bullet projectile = *ammo_bank[current_ammo];
    projectile.x = avatar.x + 1;
    projectile.y = avatar.y;
    projectile.speed = 2;
    projectile.direction = 'f';
    projectile.damage = 1;
    *ammo_bank[current_ammo] = projectile;
    current_ammo++;
}
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I have bought a book today, it's called 'Accelerated C++', ;) –  user1555816 Aug 13 '12 at 21:35
    
What does that have to do with anything –  TheLivingForce Aug 13 '12 at 21:44
1  
update your example to show how you declare screen. –  Les Aug 13 '12 at 21:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How is screen[][] declared. If it is screen[SCREEN_HEIGHT][SCREEN_WIDTH], then your problem is that you are using <= when you should just use <.

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3  
Also, you'll probably want to check on screen[projectile.x][projectile.y] = BULLET_SYMBOL that projectile.x < SCREEN_WIDTH && projectile.x >=0 && projectile.y < SCREEN_HEIGHT projectile.y >= 0 –  MartyE Aug 13 '12 at 21:42
    
That works, but it makes these weird ASCII characters at the bottom if i do that –  TheLivingForce Aug 13 '12 at 21:47
1  
How is screen defined? –  user1555816 Aug 13 '12 at 21:50
1  
@user998335 the point is an array is indexed from 0 to count-1, so very common is to find for(i=0; i<count; ++i) etc., not i<=count because that is one beyond the end of your array, and you will corrupt something if you write into array[count] –  Les Aug 13 '12 at 21:52
1  
@MartyE +1, and also, notice there is no limit or checking done on current_ammo, so ammo_bank[100] could also be overrun –  Les Aug 13 '12 at 21:55

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