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I have an array:

$a = array("Freshman Spring" => 3, "Freshman Winter" => 2, "Freshman Summer" => 4, "Freshman Fall" => 1); 

There will be different arrays for each school year, but no array will mix years such as fre, soph.

My issue is that I need to sort this array by the way seasons happen in school (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). I tried using uksort but my code there actually accomplishes nothing since it'd sort the same way regardless.

function cmp($a, $b) {
    $a = preg_replace('@^(freshman|sophomore|junior|senior) @', '', $a);
    $b = preg_replace('@^(freshman|sophomore|junior|senior) @', '', $b);
    return strcasecmp($a, $b);
}

uksort($a, "cmp");

I get this:

Array
(
    [Freshman Fall] => 1
    [Freshman Spring] => 3
    [Freshman Summer] => 4
    [Freshman Winter] => 2
)

but need to get this:

Array
(
    [Freshman Fall] => 1
    [Freshman Winter] => 2
    [Freshman Spring] => 3
    [Freshman Summer] => 4
)

Is uksort the way to go? and what am I doing wrong? Keep in mind that the array values will not be those values, they will hold objects. Any and all help is greatly appreciated!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not use the value as the key {1,2,3,4} and store the "object" as the value. Makes sorting really easy...

You can always map the {1,2,3,4} to defines or class consts if you want pretty names.

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After trying all the solutions, this one worked best. Thanks! –  Drew Bartlett Aug 14 '12 at 14:28
    
Glad I helped!! –  Mr-sk Aug 17 '12 at 17:35

You're really close. Actually, uksort is doing exactly what you're asking it to do, stripping the grade designation, and sorting alphabetically by the second word. What you need it do is a bit different - you're asking it to sort by season. You're going to have to write your own comparison for them, based on the sort order you want to see. You could use the solution given by mr-sk, or you could do something like this:

function cmp($a, $b) {
    $a = preg_replace('@^(freshman|sophomore|junior|senior) @', '', $a);
    $b = preg_replace('@^(freshman|sophomore|junior|senior) @', '', $b);
    $seasons = array("FALL"=>0, "WINTER"=>1, "SPRING"=>2, "SUMMER"=>3);
    return $seasons[strtoupper($a)]-$seasons[strtoupper($b)];
}

Also, you could change your regex (if you're sure that you'll only get those words at the beginning) to

/^\w* /

Enjoy!

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for some reason winter shows up first for me every time. I am using the real data now, not that sample array but the keys are still the same as that. –  Drew Bartlett Aug 13 '12 at 21:50
1  
Is it sorting the whole list messy, or just switching the first two? –  FrankieTheKneeMan Aug 13 '12 at 22:00
    
It's going Winter, Fall, Spring, Summer –  Drew Bartlett Aug 14 '12 at 12:45

Your code fails since you're doing a strcasecmp() on the seasons alone - in other words, you're alphabetizing the seasons, which is what youre results show. You need to sort in a defined order.

I'd do it this way, converting the seasons to pre-assigned numerics:

function cmp($a, $b) {
    $seasons = array('Fall'=>1, 'Winter'=>2, 'Spring'=>3, 'Summer'=>4);
    $aParts = explode(' ', $a);
    $bParts = explode(' ', $b);

    $a = $seasons[$aParts[1]];
    $b = $seasons[$bParts[1]]

    return $b - $a;
}

If you want to include the classes:

function cmp($a, $b) {
    $classes = array('Freshman'=>1, 'Sophomore'=>2, 'Junior'=>3, 'Senior'=>4);
    $seasons = array('Fall'=>1, 'Winter'=>2, 'Spring'=>3, 'Summer'=>4);
    list($aClass, $aSeason) = explode(' ', $a);
    list($bClass, $bSeason) = explode(' ', $b);
    $aNum = 10*$classes[$aClass] + $seasons[$aSeason];
    $bNum = 10*$classes[$bClass] + $seasons[$bSeason];

    return $bNum - $aNum;           
}
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You are sorting by the keys there not the values. If you sort by the keys, you are going to get fall < spring < summer < winter.

Just use

asort($a);

This will sort by the values (1,2,3,4) but keep the key correlations.

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"Keep in mind that the array values will not be those values, they will hold objects." –  FrankieTheKneeMan Aug 13 '12 at 21:21

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