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I am using the following block of code to post JMS messages to a queue, and get the response messages in a response queue. (The following code runs for 100 messages in batch of 20 per thread, five threads running concurrently)

    for(int i=0;i<=20;i++)
            {
                msg=myMessages.get(i); // myMessages is an array of TextMessages 
                qsender = qsession.createSender((Queue)msg.getJMSDestination());
                qreceiver=qsession.createReceiver((Queue)msg.getJMSDestination());

                tempq = qsession.createTemporaryQueue();
                responseConsumer = qsession.createConsumer(tempq);
                msg.setJMSReplyTo(tempq);
                responseConsumer.setMessageListener(new Listener());

                msg.setJMSCorrelationID(msg.getJMSCorrelationID()+i);
                qsender.send(msg);   
            }

The Listener implementation:

public class Listener 
implements MessageListener
{
    public void onMessage(Message msg)
    {
        TextMessage tm = (TextMessage) msg;
        // to calculate the response time

    }
}

The requirement is to get the response time each message takes and store it. How do I go about it? Thinking of setting the time/date in the properties for the message and then use the Correlation id to calculate the time in Listener.

Is there another way to go about it?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could have a Map<String, Long> that maps your CorrelationID to time sent and then look them up from the listener. The process that is sending the responses will have to put the correct CorrelationID on the response message for this to work.

For this example assume timemap is a Map<String, Long> and that it is in scope for both the sender and response listener (How you want to accomplish that is up to you).

Your loop body from above, modified:

            msg=myMessages.get(i); // myMessages is an array of TextMessages 
            qsender = qsession.createSender((Queue)msg.getJMSDestination());
            qreceiver=qsession.createReceiver((Queue)msg.getJMSDestination());

            tempq = qsession.createTemporaryQueue();
            responseConsumer = qsession.createConsumer(tempq);
            msg.setJMSReplyTo(tempq);
            responseConsumer.setMessageListener(new Listener());

            msg.setJMSCorrelationID(msg.getJMSCorrelationID()+i);
            /* MODIFICATIONS */  
            synchronzied(timemap){
               timemap.put(msg.getJMSCorrelationID(), System.currentTimeMillis());
            } /* END MODIFICATIONS */
            qsender.send(msg);

Your listener, modified:

public void onMessage(Message msg)
{
    TextMessage tm = (TextMessage) msg;
    long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
    long responseTime = 0;
    synchronized(timemap){
         Long sent = timemap.get(msg.getJMSCorrelationID());
         if(sent != null){
             /* Store this value, this is the response time in milliseconds */
             responseTime = now - sent; 
         }else{
             /* Error condition. */
         }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
the onMessage will be called in this case when the message reaches the receiver? or is it when the response comes back to the temporary queue? –  Chillax Aug 16 '12 at 6:58
    
The way it is wired is the same way it was in your question. The onMessage(Message) will be called when the response comes back in the temp queue. –  Dev Aug 16 '12 at 15:44
    
Here I am just setting the listener for the response message and all I am doing is sending the message to the Queue. But the Receiver should receive this message from the Queue right? When does that happen. Sorry abt my ignorance. Just a bit confused abt the whole flow. –  Chillax Aug 22 '12 at 13:08

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