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I have the following table:

ID   ActualDt   DueDt     Flag
--   -------    -------   ----    
1    01/03/12   09/13/12   Y
2    NULL       07/12/12   Y 
3    NULL       09/12/12   N
4    02/03/12   01/13/12   N

I need to mark Flag as Y for the following conditions:

1) If ActualDt is not null and DueDt is not null and DueDt > ActualDt

2) If ActualDt is null and DueDt is past due based on current date

Otherwise, Flag = N

Note that ActualDt is a string

How would I program this in t-sql

I know I need a case statement.

share|improve this question
    
Is DueDt varchar also? – Nikola Markovinović Aug 13 '12 at 21:50
2  
Why are you storing dates as strings? Ambiguous strings at that? – Aaron Bertrand Aug 13 '12 at 21:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need an update statement:

update t
    set flag = (case when ActualDt is not null and DueDt is not null and
                          DueDt > cast(ActualDt as date)
                     then 'Y'
                     when ActualDt is null and DueDt is not null and
                          DueDt > cast(CURRENT_TIMESTAMP as date)
                     then 'Y'
                     else 'N'
                end)

This query assumes that the format of the date matches the default format for the database. My database is set to US standards, so '01/03/12' is interpreted as Jan 3, 2012.

share|improve this answer
    
you don't need the IS NOT NULL checks - they are implicit when you reference the columns directly. (DueDt > something will never return true if DueDt or something is null.) – Aaron Bertrand Aug 14 '12 at 12:23
1  
@AaronBertrand . . . I am aware of that. I put in the checks for not null so the code is more explicit about what it is doing. SQL's handling of NULLs can result in confusion. – Gordon Linoff Aug 14 '12 at 13:03
    
Ok, I was only commenting because it seems redundant, but I get the explicit part too. – Aaron Bertrand Aug 14 '12 at 13:05

If I understand your logic correctly it should be:

SELECT
ID,
ActualDt,
DueDt,
CASE 
     WHEN ActualDt IS NOT NULL AND DueDt IS NOT NULL AND DueDt > ActualDt THEN 'Y'
     WHEN ActualDt IS NULL AND DueDt < getdate() THEN 'Y'
     ELSE 'N'
END as Flag
FROM YourTable

Edit: As Aaron (as usual!) pointed out, I missed that you are using a string for your dates. Since you are storing ActualDt as a string this isn't going to give you the correct result

You could cast all your date values to datetime...

SELECT
ID,
ActualDt,
DueDt,
CASE 
     WHEN cast(ActualDt as datetime) IS NOT NULL AND cast(DueDt as datetime) IS NOT NULL AND cast(DueDt as datetime) > cast(ActualDt as datetime) THEN 'Y'
     WHEN cast(ActualDt as datetime) IS NULL AND cast(DueDt as datetime) < getdate() THEN 'Y'
     ELSE 'N'
END as Flag
FROM YourTable

But just be aware that depending on the format of the date and your locale settings (and dateformat setting) you could be hitting SQL errors or unexpected dates.

It's always better to store a date as a datetime - can you explain why your dates are strings?

share|improve this answer
    
can I also show the other fields also in the same select - like ID, etc. – Nathan P Aug 13 '12 at 21:50
    
Yes - I'll update – Charleh Aug 13 '12 at 21:50
    
I don't believe you can do it in one select query. SQl does not recognize ActualDt in the case – Nathan P Aug 13 '12 at 21:56
1  
DueDt > ActualDt doesn't quite work. Is 09/13/11 > 01/03/12? It is when you're comparing strings! – Aaron Bertrand Aug 13 '12 at 22:03
    
Didn't even see that ActualDt was a string.... nasty - updated the answer – Charleh Aug 14 '12 at 8:12

The real solution here, to make your life easier, is to stop storing dates as strings. Let's say you started with this table initially:

CREATE TABLE dbo.Nathan
(
 ID INT,   
 ActualDt VARCHAR(32),  
 DueDt VARCHAR(32),     
 Flag CHAR(1)
);
GO

INSERT dbo.Nathan VALUES
(1,'01/03/12','09/13/12','Y'),
(2, NULL     ,'07/12/12','Y'), 
(3, NULL     ,'09/12/12','N'),
(4,'02/03/12','01/13/12','N');

Let's first make your strings completely unambiguous:

UPDATE dbo.Nathan
  SET ActualDt = CONVERT(CHAR(10), CONVERT(DATETIME, ActualDt, 1), 120),
      DueDt    = CONVERT(CHAR(10), CONVERT(DATETIME, DueDt   , 1), 120);

Now let's correct the data type:

ALTER TABLE dbo.Nathan ALTER COLUMN ActualDt DATE;
ALTER TABLE dbo.Nathan ALTER COLUMN DueDt DATE;
-- you should also update any parameters or code where
-- explicit types are used to populate these columns

Now your data is stored using the correct data type, and comparisons can work without all this messy string interpretation and data type conversion. Your requirements were:

I need to mark Flag as Y for the following conditions:
1) If ActualDt is not null and DueDt is not null and DueDt > ActualDt
2) If ActualDt is null and DueDt is past due based on current date
Otherwise, Flag = N

To me that is written as:

UPDATE dbo.Nathan
  SET Flag = CASE WHEN DueDt > ActualDt
    OR (ActualDt IS NULL AND DueDt < CURRENT_TIMESTAMP)
  THEN 'Y' ELSE 'N' END;

Results:

ID  ActualDt    DueDt       Flag
--  ----------  ----------  ----
1   2012-01-03  2012-09-13  Y  -- DueDt > ActualDt
2   NULL        2012-07-12  Y  -- past due
3   NULL        2012-09-12  N  -- not past due
4   2012-02-03  2012-01-13  N  -- DueDt NOT > ActualDt

This, I think, is a much better approach than just continuing to store dates as strings.

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