Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Consider:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T> T getArray( T &arr ) {
    return *arr;
}

int main() {

    int a[] = {5, 3, 6};

    std::cout << getArray(a);

}

It's suppose to print the first element in the array but it is not not working. Why is that?

It gives me the error:

error: no matching function for call to 'getArray(int [3])'
share|improve this question
2  
"it is not not working" - can you elaborate? – Mysticial Aug 13 '12 at 22:04
3  
The type of a is int[3], so the type of T is int[3]. Arrays cannot be returned from functions. – GManNickG Aug 13 '12 at 22:07
2  
i think that you should read about the difference between C and C++ regarding the pointers. – user827992 Aug 13 '12 at 22:09
3  
@Robert Harvey: While the question is not really well written out, I do think that it is an interesting question, as it is pure SFINAE where you would not expect it. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 13 '12 at 22:10
3  
@Mysticial: I have not seen any previous version of the question... Still closing without giving a chance to edit the question seems harsh – David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 13 '12 at 22:13
up vote 12 down vote accepted

The type of a is int[3], so the type of T is int[3]. Arrays cannot be returned from functions.

In C++11, you can do this:

template <typename T>
auto getArray(T &arr) -> decltype(*arr)
{ 
    return *arr; 
} 

Or this:

// requires <type_traits>

template <typename T>
typename std::remove_extent<T>::type& getArray(T &arr)
{ 
    return *arr; 
} 

In C++03 you can do this, but it's not quite the same:

template <typename T>
T getArray(T* arr /* not really an array */)
{ 
    return *arr; 
} 

Or:

template <typename T, std::size_t N>
T getArray(T (&arr)[N])
{ 
    return *arr; 
} 
share|improve this answer
2  
In case the OP is wondering how remove_extent may be defined: template<class T> struct remove_extent { typedef typename T type; }; template<class T, size_t N> struct remove_extent<T[N]> { typedef typename T type; }; – Mehrdad Aug 13 '12 at 22:17
1  
It seems to me that this results in two functionally different function templates, because the one using decltype will return a reference, and the one using remove_extent returns by value. – Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 13 '12 at 22:25
    
I'm a beginner. I get that these functions are supposed to return the first element in the array, but what I don't get is what -> decltype(*arr) and size_t is suppose to do? – template boy Aug 13 '12 at 22:27
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb: That is correct, thanks! – GManNickG Aug 13 '12 at 22:33
    
@user6607: decltype gives you the type of an expression. Because *arr has the type int&, the function returns an int&. We let the compiler do the work of figuring out what to return. size_t is an unsigned integer type that's used for holding the size of things, including arrays. – GManNickG Aug 13 '12 at 22:35

Try

template <typename T, size_t N>
T getArray( T (&arr)[N] ) {
    return *arr;
}

so that T is the type of the element, not the array.

share|improve this answer

It does not even compile on MSVC++ 2010 Express. As I expected, this is because you are using a reference as a parameter, a scalar as a return value and a pointer is passed to the function call. I do not know the exact rules regarding templates (i.e. how exactly the type is determined) but that code has to be confusing the hell out of the compiler. The following code returns what you expected it to return.

#include <iostream>

template <typename T> T getArray( T* arr ) {
    return *arr;
}

int main() {

    int a[] = {5, 3, 6};

    std::cout << getArray(a);

}
share|improve this answer
2  
In the original code, there is no pointer being passed to the function, rather a reference to an array. Since that makes T be an array and an array cannot be returned SFINAE is disabling that template. It is important not to confuse people with the bad-old an array is a pointer thing. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 13 '12 at 22:15

Could you try :

#include <iostream>

template <typename T> T getArray( T arr[] ) {
    return *arr;
}

int main() {

    int a[] = {5, 3, 6};

    std::cout << getArray(a);

}
share|improve this answer
    
to be conform to last standards you should change iostream.h to iostream and add the line using namespace std; or use std::cout. I didn't that on my response in other to follow you code style. – André Oriani Aug 13 '12 at 22:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.