Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Here is the class I am unit testing. Currently I am testing the doSomething function:

class FooClass {
  public function doSomething( $user ) {
    $conn = $this->getUniqueConnection( $user->id );
    $conn->doSomethingDestructive();
  }

  private function getUniqueConnection( $id ) {
    return new UniqueConnection( $id );
  }
}

As you can see, the doSomething function gets a new instance of UniqueConnection (a class I am not testing here) based on a property of the argument it receives. The problem is that UniqueConnection:: doSomethingDestructive method is something I cannot call during tests due to its... destructiveness. So I would like to stub/mock the UniqueConnection rather than use a real one.

I don't see any way to inject my mocked UniqueConnection. I would make the UniqueConnection a constructor argument for FooClass but, as you can see, a new one gets created based on the parameter to the doSomething function and all the unique ids it may be called with are not known ahead of time.

My only option that I can see is to test a mock of FooClass instead of FooClass itself. Then I would replace the getUniqueConnection function with one that returns a mock/stub. This seems bad to test an mock, but I don't see any way to achieve what I am after otherwise. UniqueConnection is a third party vendor library and cannot be modified.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could make a UniqueConnectionFactory, and pass an instance of that to FooClass. Then you have

  private function getUniqueConnection( $id ) {
    return $this->uniqueConnectionFactory->create( $id );
  }

In general, this is one of the benefits of using a factory - you keep the new operator out of the class, which allows you to more easily vary the object being created.

share|improve this answer

Like Rambo Coder said, it's a matter of doing too much in your class. I wouldn't go as far as wanting to create a Factory, especially if you'll only ever create an instance of one specific class. The simplest solution would be to invert the responsibility of creating the UniqueConnection:

<?php
class FooClass {
  public function doSomething( UniqueConnection $connection ) {
    $connection->doSomethingDestructive( );
  }
}

Pass a mock when you're testing, pass a new UniqueConnection( $user->id ) in the real code..

share|improve this answer

Until you can take the time to refactor the code to use a factory as rambo coder recommends, you can use a partial mock to return a non-destructive unique connection. When you find yourself in this position, it usually means the class under test has more than one responsibility.

function testSomething() {
    $mockConn = $this->getMock('UniqueConnection');
    $mockConn->expects($this->once())
             ->method('doSomethingDestructive')
             ->will(...);
    $mockFoo = $this->getMock('FooClass', array('getUniqueConnection'));
    $mockFoo->expects($this->once())
            ->method('getUniqueConnection')
            ->will($this->returnValue($mockConn));
    $mockFoo->doSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Apart from the possibilities of having more than one responsible, is the added complexity for partial mock, really a better option? – Starx Aug 14 '12 at 9:30
    
@Starx - Better than modifying the production code and leaving it half-tested? Yes! It only looks complicated because the mocking API is a bit verbose. – David Harkness Aug 14 '12 at 17:18

Creating classes in a way that it can support different modes of execution is very important in some cases. One of these cases is what you are asking for.

Create your classes to support various modes. For example

Class Connection {
    private $mode;

    public function setMode($mode) {
         $this -> $mode = $mode;
    }
}

Now, your doSomethingDestructive can act as per the execution mode.

public function doSomethingDestructive() {
    if($this -> mode === "test") { //if we are in a test mode scenario
        //Log something
        // Or just do some logging and give a message
    } else {
        // do what it was suppose to do
    }
}

Next time, when you are testing the class, you dont have to worry about that destructive function doing something destruction accidentally.

  public function doSomething( $user ) {
    $conn = $this->getUniqueConnection( $user->id );
    $conn -> setMode("test"); //Now we are safe
    $conn->doSomethingDestructive(); //But the Testing is still being Ran
  }
share|improve this answer
2  
I would avoid putting the testing behavior in the original class. Instead create a testing class with the testing behavior. – ThomasW Aug 14 '12 at 0:04
    
@ThomasW, Creating a different class for testing only and removing them, once test stage is complete, also could be a way to go. But creating different execution modes of object is also a very good option. If object support different modes like "Debug", "Test", "Read Only" then it becomes very handy on phases of Iterative Development, Prototyping and also Agile methodologies. – Starx Aug 14 '12 at 0:15
    
The downside with having different execution modes is that you must test the mode-switching code. You're still left with the original problem while testing the production mode. – David Harkness Aug 14 '12 at 8:38
    
@DavidHarkness, Switching mode's generally happen globally in either the application domain or root class. That is just one case to test. Besides, the solution I am providing removes the need of a mock object in the first place, by only executing test friendly codes in test mode. – Starx Aug 14 '12 at 9:41
    
@Starx - The code that sets the mode is in one place, but code that checks that mode and does X or Y based on its value is strewn throughout the production code. The problem isn't the picking between X and Y, it's that the unit tests only ever execute one of the branches. – David Harkness Aug 14 '12 at 17:22

In this case what you want is not a mock object, but a testing subclass. Break your $conn->doSomethingDestructive(); into a method, then subclass FooClass as TestFooClass and override the new method in the subclass. Then you can test using the subclass without getting the unwanted destructive behavior.

For example:

class FooClass {
  public function doSomething( $user ) {
    $conn = $this->getUniqueConnection( $user->id );
    $this->connDoSomethingDestructive($conn);
  }

  protected function connDoSomethingDestructive($conn) {
    $conn->doSomethingDestructive();
  }

  private function getUniqueConnection( $id ) {
    return new UniqueConnection( $id );
  }
}

class TestFooClass extends FooClass {
  protected function connDoSomethingDestructive() {

  }

  private function getUniqueConnection( $id ) {
    return new MockUniqueConnection( $id );
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by breaking $conn->doSomethingDestructive() into a method? – william Aug 14 '12 at 0:15
    
By "to break into a method" I mean to create a new method to handle that functionality. I've updated my answer to indicate what I mean. – ThomasW Aug 14 '12 at 0:27
    
While this works, it seems easier to use a partial mock that returns a non-destructive connection. – David Harkness Aug 14 '12 at 8:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.