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I have two structs and a function

struct nodeT {
bool last;
string attribute1;
string attribute2;
string attribute3;
vector<charT> leafs;
};

struct charT {
char character;
nodeT *next;
};

void addNode(nodeT *n, string stringy, string &attribute1, string &attribute2, string &attribute3)
{
   if (stringy=="") {
      w->last=true;
      return;
   } else {
      if (n->last==true) {
          attribute1=n->attribute1; //these attribute fields were given values earlier
          attribute2=n->attribute2;
          attribute3=n->attribute3;
      }
      addNode(n, stringy.substr(1), attribute);
   }
}

And addNode is called with

string test="";
addNode(root, "wordy", test, test, test);

The problem is the attribute reference string &attribute is not changed to 5, it continues the next call with the "" value.

I tried making it a pointer reference *attribute->n->attribute And tied a reference &attribute = n->attribute These were shots in the dark and did not work.

EDIT: addNode should have been called with individual memory references.

string test1="";
string test2="";
string test3="";
addNode(root, "wordy", test1, test2, test3);
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1  
Compile with level 4 warnings (/W4) and see what warnings you get. –  In silico Aug 13 '12 at 23:17
1  
Doesn't the compiler just spit at the line string attribute = 5;? See ideone.com/xVg0C, but that's gcc... –  krlmlr Aug 13 '12 at 23:23
    
I think I found the problem - following the advice of these comments. I created two values int j = 0 and then string temp = "" for the initial call (there are 5 attributes) and then used these two for all five. –  forest.peterson Aug 13 '12 at 23:27
1  
addNode references the undefined identifier w, so this code won't even compile. string attribute = 5; also makes no sense -- 5 is an integer not a string and can't be converted to one implicitly. –  Chris Dodd Aug 13 '12 at 23:30
    
yes, my bad example, the code is a mess and I just wanted to post a simple example but goofed it –  forest.peterson Aug 13 '12 at 23:32

3 Answers 3

Have you tried initializing attribute in a constructor?

struct nodeT {
   bool last;
   string attribute;
   vector<charT> leafs;
   nodeT() : attribute("5") {}
 };

Your code looks somewhat, but not entirely, unlike Java... :-)

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funny, I learned java before C++ but do not remember java anymore. –  forest.peterson Aug 13 '12 at 23:31
    
yes, attribute has values from an earlier pass through the tree. I posted a simplified example here and did not fully capture what I have –  forest.peterson Aug 13 '12 at 23:36
    
no, I have not tried initializing with a constructor but I will remember that approach for future reference. –  forest.peterson Aug 14 '12 at 0:00

No of args for function declaration and function call don't match and function dosnt have variable arg. It should not clear compilation hurdels also.

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are you comparing the EDIT update to the original post? –  forest.peterson Aug 14 '12 at 20:28
    
I corrected the error in the question, there are three parameters for attribute - I used a simplified example and lost some of the context of the question –  forest.peterson Aug 15 '12 at 16:48
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The answers made by the contributors helped lead me to the answer but they have been hitting answers slightly off from the issue.

For setup, function uses structs nodeT and charT and is was called with the equivalent of

   root is defined globally in the class
   string wordy = "hello";
   string test="";
   addNode(root, "wordy", test, test, test);

addNode should have been called with individual memory references.

string test1="";
string test2="";
string test3="";
addNode(root, "wordy", test1, test2, test3);

So when later when attributes 1, 2 and 3 are changed with unique values, there is a corresponding unique memory for each.

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