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I'm learning Python OOP and trying to convert a Java class to a Python class

See page 15 in this PDF for Java code google doc link

class QuickFindUF:
        """docstring for QuickFindUF"""


    def __init__(self, n):
            self.id = []
            for e in range(n):
                    self.id.append(e)


    def connected(self,p,q):
            return self.id[p]==self.id[q]

    def union(self,p,q):
            self.pid = self.id[p]
            self.qid = self.id[q]
            for i in range(len(self.id)):
                    if(self.id[i]==self.pid):
                            self.id[i]=self.qid


quf = QuickFindUF(9)
quf.union(3,4)
print quf.connected(3,4)

There are 16 self keywords in this class. Is there a better way to write this class?

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2  
self.id=[]; for e in range(n): self.id.append(e) is precisely the same as self.id=list(range(n)). Also, ensure your class inherits from object() =) –  katrielalex Aug 13 '12 at 23:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yea, you don't want to assign these variables to self, these are local variables:

def union(self,p,q):
        self.pid = self.id[p]
        self.qid = self.id[q]
        for i in range(len(self.id)):
                if(self.id[i]==self.pid):
                        self.id[i]=self.qid

Should be:

def union(self,p,q):
    pid = self.id[p]
    qid = self.id[q]
    for i in range(len(self.id)):
        if self.id[i] == pid:
            self.id[i] = qid

You only use self when referring to instance variables, not to any variable inside of a method.

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You could use some shortcuts:

class QuickFindUF:
    """docstring for QuickFindUF"""

    def __init__(self, n):
        self.id = range(n)

    def connected(self,p,q):
        _id = self.id
        return _id[p]==_id[q]

    def union(self,p,q):
        _id = self.id
        pid = _id[p]
        qid = _id[q]
        for (k, _i) in enumerate(_id):
           if (_i == pid):
               _id[k]=qid

Note the simplification in __init__, as pointed by @katrielalex, and the use of enumerate instead of looping on range(len(self.id)).

Using shortcuts can be a bit more efficient (as you save a call to __getattr__), but should not impair readability.

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