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I have been using the flowing code to check if a form already exists.

function FormExists(apForm: TObject): boolean;
var i: Word;
begin
  Result := False;
  for i := 0 to Application.ComponentCount-1 do
    if Application.Components[i] = apForm then begin
      Result := True;
      Break;
    end;
end;

I got It some years ago from a projects I participated in. It was one of my first Delphi projects.

It works.

But this week I got wandering if there is a better, faster way to do this

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1  
Has this function ever returned false? If so in what condition? Asking because it is unclear what do you mean with 'exists'. –  Sertac Akyuz Aug 13 '12 at 23:51
    
Yes It does. If the form is not created. –  Jlouro Aug 13 '12 at 23:54
    
Well, as you've already mentioned in a comment just test for Asssigned. –  Sertac Akyuz Aug 14 '12 at 0:00
    
@Sertac, but if you don't use FreeAndNil the form variable can be assigned but the window can be destroyed. It must have also a valid handle for its existence. –  TLama Aug 14 '12 at 0:02
1  
@TLama - I think I get it. But I wouldn't test for window handle on a dangling pointer. I myself assign nil to the global variable in OnDestroy. –  Sertac Akyuz Aug 14 '12 at 0:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can use Screen.Forms for that instead. It lessens the items you're iterating through:

function FormExists(apForm: TForm): boolean;
var 
  i: Word;
begin
  Result := False;
  for i := 0 to Screen.FormCount - 1 do
    if Screen.Forms[i] = apForm then 
    begin
      Result := True;
      Break;
    end;
end;

However, it's worth noting that if you have apForm already, you know it exists and there's no need to be searching for it.

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But that is the case. In some cases I don't know. to the rest I use "Assigned". –  Jlouro Aug 13 '12 at 23:47
    
@Jlouro, then simply nil the global form variable like Sertac said to use the Assigned test or use this kind of iteration. It wouldn't be safe to ask for a valid handle of an already released control's variable. –  TLama Aug 14 '12 at 0:34

I found that the best way to do this is to ask the form itself if it is open. You can do so with a CLASS procedure/function. It is safe to call a class procedure/function of a form even if it doesn't exist.

add a class function to your form's public desclaration.

  type
    TForm2 = class(TForm)
      ...
    private
      { Private declarations }
      ...
    public
      { Public declarations }
      class function FormExists:  Boolean;
    end;

  class function TForm2.FormExists: Boolean;
  var
     F: TForm2;
     I: Integer;
  begin
     F := nil;
     for i := Screen.FormCount - 1 DownTo 0 do
      if (Screen.Forms[i].Name = 'Form2') then
      begin
         F := Screen.Forms[I] As TForm2;
         break;
      end;
     Result :=  F <> nil;
  end;

So from any unit that has Form2 in the uses clause can call

     if Form2.FormExists then
        ...
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2  
-1. This is the totally wrong solution. It ties your code to a specific form name. You never test against Name; it makes everything too specific, and makes your code unable to be re-used elsewhere. –  Ken White Aug 14 '12 at 1:54
    
In addition to Ken's comment, you don't need F and F <> nil, you already have a boolean; Result. Set Result to False at start, in the 'if' test in the 'for' loop, set Result to True and break. –  Sertac Akyuz Aug 14 '12 at 2:01
    
@KenWhite It straight forward object oriented approach to this. The form object can tell you itself if it is open or not. In your approach you need to know and provide a piece of data about the form in question. The added benefit to this approach, that I use is that with F, if it isn't nil, is a reference to the form itself, and you can check the status of your form's components. I use it to know if a document I'm working on has been modified, and if so, I bring the form forward, and present the user with the option to save. Something your approach would have difficult time accomplishing. –  user582118 Aug 14 '12 at 2:06
2  
Hard-coding a reference to 'Name = 'Form2'` is like tatooing the name of your first girlfriend on a private part of your body. Fine if you always date a woman with the same name, but really bad otherwise. You never hard-code a name reference - ever. Did I mention never ever? Your code is wrong. It has nothing to do with "object orientation" - it's bad code to hard-code a reference to a specific name. It breaks: var MyForm: TForm2; ... MyForm := TForm2.Create(nil); MyForm.Name := 'Mary';, and your code no longer works. –  Ken White Aug 14 '12 at 2:08
4  
The problem from my point of view is not so much the hardcoded name but the fact that you have to duplicate the same code for every form class that needs this ability. That's what IMHO makes the "procedural" approach much better in this case. –  jpfollenius Aug 14 '12 at 6:18

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