Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a written a sequential merge sort program as below:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "iostream"
#include "omp.h"
#include "fstream"
using namespace std;

int a[50];
void merge(int,int,int); 
void merge_sort(int low,int high)
{
int mid,newval;
double clock, clock1,clock2;
if(low<high)
 {
    mid=(low+high)/2;
    #pragma omp parallel shared(low,mid,high) num_threads(2)
    {
        //newval=omp_get_thread_num();
        //cout<<"thread: "<<newval<<endl;
        merge_sort(low,mid);
        clock=omp_get_wtime();
        //cout<<"Clock: "<<clock<<endl;
        merge_sort(mid+1,high);
        merge(low,mid,high);
        clock1=omp_get_wtime();
        //cout<<"Clock1: "<<clock<<endl;
        clock2=clock1-clock;
        cout<<"Clock2: "<<clock2<<endl;
    }       
    //cout<<"valud=%d"<<low<<endl; 
 }
 }
 void merge(int low,int mid,int high)
 {
 int h,i,j,b[50],k;
 h=low;
 i=low;
 j=mid+1;

 while((h<=mid)&&(j<=high))
 {
    if(a[h]<=a[j])
    {
        b[i]=a[h];
        h++;
    }
    else
    {
        b[i]=a[j];
        j++;
    }
    i++;
 }
 if(h>mid)
 {
    for(k=j;k<=high;k++)
    {
        b[i]=a[k];
        i++;
    }
 }
 else
 {
    for(k=h;k<=mid;k++)
    {
        b[i]=a[k];
        i++;
    }
 }
 for(k=low;k<=high;k++) a[k]=b[k];
    }

    void main()
    {
int num,i;
int clock_n,len;
FILE *fp;
char *buf;
char *newchat;//ifstream properfile;


cout<<"********************************************************************************"<<endl;
cout<<"                             MERGE SORT PROGRAM"<<endl;

cout<<"********************************************************************************"<<endl;
cout<<endl<<endl;
cout<<"Please Enter THE NUMBER OF ELEMENTS you want to sort [THEN PRESS ENTER]:"<<endl;
cout<<endl;
//cout<<"Now, Please Enter the ( "<< num <<" ) numbers (ELEMENTS) [THEN PRESS ENTER]:"<<endl;
//for(i=1;i<=num;i++)
//{
        fp=fopen("E:\\Study\\Semester 2\\Compsci 711- Parallel and distributed computing\\Assignment\\sample_10.txt","rb");
fseek(fp,0,SEEK_END); //go to end
len=ftell(fp); //get position at end (length)
cout<<"Length is %d"<<len<<endl;
//fseek(fp,0,SEEK_SET); //go to beg.
buf=(char *)malloc(len); //malloc buffer
newchat=buf;
fread(newchat,len,1,fp); //read into buffer
fclose(fp);
//cout<<"Read %c"<<newchat<<endl;

////cin>>num;


//}

    merge_sort(1,len);

cout<<endl;
cout<<"So, the sorted list (using MERGE SORT) will be :"<<endl;
cout<<endl<<endl;

for(i=1;i<=num;i++)
cout<<a[i]<<"   ";
cout<<endl<<endl<<endl<<endl;

  }

Now I want to parallelize this code(API used for parallelization in C is OPENMP). Can you help people me out? Basically I use #pragma parallel num_thread(4) but I dont know whether I should include anything else in order for parallelization to take place.

share|improve this question
    
what speedup are you getting using this code ?? i mean parallel vs no-pragmas ?? –  prathmesh.kallurkar Aug 14 '12 at 9:39
    
Also compare your algorithm with the gnu parallel implementation of std::sort... –  linello Aug 14 '12 at 10:02
add comment

2 Answers

The main bottleneck of a merge-sort algorithm is the merge function. Its complexity is O(n). The cost of first few merge operations is going to dominate the cost of your complete application. Use an optimized parallel algorithm for larger arrays.

For smaller arrays (<20 elements), avoid the barriers. Actually I would prefer a sequential O(n^2) algorithm.

Shouldn't you use sections instead of #pragma omp parallel shared(low,mid,high) num_threads(2)

share|improve this answer
    
Since the number of elements are more than 100 I am using parallel algorithm. Should I use sections? Since I am new to Openmp I am finding it quite confusing. Because in java we can use .start(), sleep() inbuilt functions but here I am not even sure whether the threads are running or not. –  Rigorous implementation Aug 14 '12 at 10:20
    
my main doubt is whether the program that I have written above is logically correct for a parallel merge sort or not. –  Rigorous implementation Aug 14 '12 at 10:36
    
see, i can really talk at a logical level. Whether it is correct or not must be checked yourself, right ?? Section is a primitive in openMP which sort of forks two threads for all the sections in your block. The advantage of sections is that you do not have to worry about the number of active threads and thread scheduling. OpenMP handles all that for you. –  prathmesh.kallurkar Aug 14 '12 at 10:54
    
Ok!! I freaked out because I am new to OpenMP. Is there a way you could give me some examples on how I should use these sections in OpenMP? Thanks. –  Rigorous implementation Aug 19 '12 at 6:05
    
@linello: How should I go about comparing it? –  Rigorous implementation Aug 19 '12 at 6:06
add comment

If sorting under 128 intergers 32bit (which will fit well in the cpu cache) you should do a Binary Insert sort is generaly best.

If sort larger numbers these following papers cover how to make a parrallel merge sort.

http://www1.chapman.edu/~radenski/research/papers/mergesort-pdpta11.pdf

This paper covers the splits parralel on both OMP and MPI what it doesnt not explain is how to do the merges in parallel

http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~ogreen3/_docs/Merge_Path_-_Parallel_Merging_Made_Simple.pdf

This paper explains how to do the merges in parralel. Despite its name it was pretty confusing to me at first but it boils down to this, when sorting two allready sorted list the rank sort(the normal merge method) either goes down (up array A) or a cross (up array B) the merge matrix in what is called the merge path. if using multiple processors you can split the region up and do a rank sort at any piont by finding the merge path by using the diagonals and binary search.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.