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Why does this method result in a runtime error? I understand the calc wont work with an empty string, so I set hour to 0 if this is the case.

Call:

String hoursJLabel = actionObject.calculateHours();
totalHours.setText(hoursJLabel);

Method:

public String calculateHours (){
    double sum = 0;
    double hour = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 7; i++) {
        if (hourArray[i].getText() != "") {
            hour = Double.parseDouble(hourArray[i].getText());
        }
        else  {
            hour = 0;
        }
    }
    sum += hour;
    return String.format("%.2f", sum);
}
share|improve this question
    
Please show the exception stack trace. –  Paul Bellora Aug 14 '12 at 3:07
    
!= "" is definitely a problem, though it might not be the problem. Always use .equals to compare strings. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 14 '12 at 3:58
    
I'm not sure what your code is supposed to be doing, but don't you want the sum += hour to be inside the for loop? –  Liron Aug 14 '12 at 4:22
    
@David has any of our answers solved your problem or do you need further help? –  Uooo Aug 23 '12 at 9:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are multiple possibilities where a runtime error can occur in calculateHours():

  • hourArray is null and throws a NullPointerException
  • any hourArray[i] is null and throws a NullPointerException
  • hourArray[i].getText() can not be parsed to a Double and throws a NumberFormatException
  • Your hourArray might contains of less than 7 elements, which throws an IndexOutOfBoundsException

Beside that, hourArray[i].getText() != "" is a bad comparison because it does not check null and checks if the two objects are the same object, not if they are equal.

In addition, I guess you want to have sum += hour inside the loop, otherwise sum will contain the last value of the hourArray.

So, your method should look like this:

public String calculateHours (){
    double sum = 0;
    if(hourArray != null){ // hourArray might be null
        double hour = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < hourArray.length; i++) { // use .length here
            // check for nulls and empty String
            if (hourArray[i] != null && hourArray[i].getText() != null 
                                     && !"".equals(hourArray[i].getText())) {
                try{ // the text might can not be parsed to a double
                    hour = Double.parseDouble(hourArray[i].getText());
                }catch(NumberFormatException ex){
                    hour = 0;
                }
            }
            else  {
                hour = 0;
            }
            sum += hour; // I guess you want that inside your loop
        }
    }
    return String.format("%.2f", sum);
}

Anyway, it would be better if this class is written in a way that it does not have to check for all this possibilities in the calculateHours() method. You notice how hard it becomes to read if all these checks must be done here.

share|improve this answer

To check if a non-null String is empty, use length() method:

if (hourArray[i].getText().length() == 0) ...

If a string could be null, add a check before the length, like this:

String str = hourArray[i].getText();
if (str != null && str.length() == 0) ...

If you use Java-6 or later, you can simplify it further:

String str = hourArray[i].getText();
if (str != null && str.isEmpty()) ...
share|improve this answer
    
Or .isEmpty() :) –  Paul Bellora Aug 14 '12 at 3:12
    
@PaulBellora That's not available until Java-6, but you're right. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 14 '12 at 3:13

FI: Apache commons StringUtils has a method isBlank that would handle null, empty and strings with only spaces etc.,

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