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I have 3 models: User, Object, Likes

Currently, I have the model: a user has many Objects. How do I go about modeling:

1) A user can like many objects

2) an Object can have many likes (from different users)

So I want to be able to do something like this:

User.likes = list of objects liked by a user

Objects.liked_by = list of Users liked by object

The model below is definitely wrong...

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :objects
  has_many :objects, :through => :likes
end

class Likes < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :object
end

class Objects < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :users
  has_many :users, :through => :likes    
end
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2  
you seem to confuse singular and plural –  Niklas B. Aug 14 '12 at 3:46
    
Yes, the class names should be Like and Object, instead of Likes and Objects. Unfortunately you cannot use Object, because it's already used by Ruby. You have to think of another name. Item or something. –  Mischa Aug 14 '12 at 6:46
    
Thanks guys. My models are now all singular. Also, the Object class was just for demonstration purposes. I didn't know you couldn't name it Object either way though. thanks for the tip. –  user1099123 Aug 14 '12 at 11:40
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To elaborate further on my comment to Brandon Tilley's answer, I would suggest the following:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  # your original association
  has_many :things

  # the like associations
  has_many :likes
  has_many :liked_things, :through => :likes, :source => :thing
end

class Like < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :thing
end

class Thing < ActiveRecord::Base
  # your original association
  belongs_to :user

  # the like associations
  has_many :likes
  has_many :liking_users, :through => :likes, :source => :user
end
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so this worked! Changing the has_many name to liked_things and liking_users with a source finally differentiated how the sql is generated. I really want to thank everyone for helping! –  user1099123 Aug 14 '12 at 11:41
    
@severin What would a minimalist Thing table and a minimalist Like table look like? –  pratski Aug 18 '13 at 12:15
1  
@pratski The likes table needs to contain references to the user and the liked thing, so the absolutely minimal stuff it needs is a user_id and a thing_id. You need nothing special in the things table... –  severin Aug 19 '13 at 5:38
    
There is absolutely no need for a join model here. Just create a HABTM relation between User and Thing, create a new row in the join table for each "like", use @user.things to see how many and what things have they liked and vice versa. You can also name the associations and tables to follow the "like" naming if you want to. too much code for a simple thing imho. –  Tanel Suurhans Feb 9 at 2:43
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You are close; to use a :through, relation, you first must set up the relationship you're going through:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :likes
  has_many :objects, :through => :likes
end

class Likes < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :object
end

class Objects < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :likes
  has_many :users, :through => :likes    
end

Note that Objects should has_many :likes, so that the foreign key is in the right place. (Also, you should probably use the singular form Like and Object for your models.)

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+1 This is exactly what I would do also. –  Michael Durrant Aug 14 '12 at 4:11
    
Hmm this didn't exactly work. I want to preserve the association between an object and a user. An object belongs to a user regardless of if a user likes it or not. Think of it as a forum post. a Post belongs to a User even though they don't "like" it. In this model, I can't do something like: User.objects without it looking to see if a user liked the object. –  user1099123 Aug 14 '12 at 5:45
    
Then just add these associations: has_many :objects in User and belongs_to :user in Objects. Another suggestion: check your singular/plural usage: AR class names should always be singular. And you need to find another name for Objects since the singular would clash with the Object base class... –  severin Aug 14 '12 at 7:15
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Here is a simple method to achieve this. Basically, you can create as many relationships as needed as long as you specify the proper class name using the :class_name option. However, it is not always a good idea, so make sure only one is used during any given request, to avoid additional queries.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :likes, :include => :obj
  has_many :objs
  has_many :liked, :through => :likes, :class_name => 'Obj'
end

class Like < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :obj
end

class Obj < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  has_many :likes, :include => :user

  has_many :users, :through => :likes

  # having both belongs to and has many for users may be confusing 
  # so it's better to use a different name

  has_many :liked_by, :through => :likes, :class_name => 'User'   
end


u = User.find(1)
u.objs # all objects created by u
u.liked # all objects liked by u
u.likes # all likes    
u.likes.collect(&:obj) # all objects liked by u


o = Obj.find(1)
o.user # creator
o.users # users who liked o
o.liked_by # users who liked o. same as o.users
o.likes # all likes for o
o.likes.collect(&:user)
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1  
This won't work as Object is a predefined class in Ruby being the base class for all (or almost all in 1.9) classes. –  Holger Just Aug 14 '12 at 6:45
    
Of course it wont. It's just for the purpose of illustrating the relations based on the question. changed to Obj. –  SMathew Aug 14 '12 at 6:47
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Models & associations as per naming conventions of rails modeling

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :likes
  has_many :objects, :through => :likes
end

class Like < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :object
end

class Object < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user

  has_many :likes
  has_many :users, :through => :likes    
end

Also, you can use of already built-in gems like acts-as-taggable-on to have same functionality without code :)

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