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I am thinking about this problem when I am doing C++ related Linux work.

There are couple of question I want to ask:

  1. Does C++-style dynamic allocation support Linux system call?

    Since C++ uses new/delete, in man page, linux system call uses C-style dynamic allocation. Could we use them interchangeably or there is a restriction of passing C++-style dynamic variable to C-style dynamic variable? Or just keep them as long as consistent, it will be ok?

    I hope answer with good coding style (such as easily maintainable, easily debug)

  2. In additional, this question more focus on how to use C++ to develop Linux system related work?

    Do I just use C whenever I need, otherwise I just use C++ for my major work? Or there is a better way to do this ?

  3. In a header, let's say glob.h, in C++ program, should we just #include <glob.h> or there is a other way?

I really want to know what is the standard of industry about this problem.

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closed as not constructive by meagar, therefromhere, Paul R, Griwes, Nemo Aug 14 '12 at 14:24

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as for (1), which man page are you talking about? –  Vaughn Cato Aug 14 '12 at 4:52
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You've posted a bunch of (more or less) unrelated questions. You shouldn't do that. Your post should contain a single clear and concise question. –  meagar Aug 14 '12 at 4:53
    
@VaughnCato just in general. or you could give a link which I can find whether it has been supported or not. –  lightmanhk Aug 14 '12 at 5:01
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In my experience, system calls don't allocate or free memory, so your data can be allocated any way you like, even on the stack. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 14 '12 at 5:02
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Post them here, but post one at a time. –  meagar Aug 14 '12 at 5:04

3 Answers 3

1.Does C++-style dynamic allocation support Linux system call?

Since C++ uses new/delete, in man page, linux system call uses C-style dynamic allocation. Could we use them interchangeably or there is a restriction of passing C++-style dynamic variable to C-style dynamic variable? Or just keep them as long as consistent, it will be ok?

new and delete can not be safely mixed with malloc, realloc and free. But, C++ can itself use malloc, realloc and free, sometimes fine, but for proper "objects" it'll only get you so far: lots of existing C++ library code hardcodes use of new and delete and you'd need to handle "placement-newing" and destructing objects yourself. You could explore defining your own new and delete operator in terms of malloc and free - I've never seen it done though. Typical C heap functions are probably optimised for larger average allocation sizes, whereas C++ can involve large numbers of small requests, so there may be performance and memory package efficiency considerations....

I hope answer with good coding style (such as easily maintainable, easily debug)

For maintainability and consistency, C++ programs tend to minimise or eliminate their use of malloc et al.

2.In additional, this question more focus on how to use C++ to develop Linux system related work?

Do I just use C whenever I need, otherwise I just use C++ for my major work? Or there is a better way to do this ?

C++ is a near superset of C, with some very nice features for writing large, maintainable and efficient programs. If you know how to use it, IMHO you should use it by default. Use C when you need more portability, or want to work in a team with other people you can't trust to use C++ sensibly! (And I say that in earnest.)

3.In a header, let's say glob.h, in C++ program, should we just #include or there is a other way?

Yes... but you may wish to surround that with extern "C" { on the previous line and } on the following line to suppress C++ symbol name mangling.

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To your answer for #1 - I will say that there is not a single system call which calls malloc, that makes no sense at all and misunderstands the meaning of the term "system call". Now, libraries which return heap allocated buffers is another story... –  asveikau Aug 14 '12 at 5:16
    
@asveikau: I agree... it makes no sense to talk of malloc - being a libC intra-process function - in the context of a system call into the kernel. Therefore, I ignored that aspect of the question and focused on libraries, and meaningful aspects of the choice between malloc/free and new/delete in C++.... –  Tony D Aug 14 '12 at 5:22

# 1. Yes

# 2.

Do I just use c whenever I need, otherwise I just use c++ for my major work?

Yes.

The vast majority of linux's features are provided by C interfaces. boost is a great counter-example. You won't find linux-specific features there, but the generic ones are a much more natural fit than the ones offered by glibc.

# 3. Yes, you can do that, or you could consider boost::filesystem (or similar).

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IIRC (been about 5 years since I wrote C++ on *nix) C++ can be written and compiled exactly like a C program, using the same C syntax etc. depending on the compiler. I believe the gnu compiler supports this. It is a danger that C programmers encounter moving to C++ in that they write C++ programs that are really C programs except with cpp at the end. :D

What I am getting at is that you when you write your C++ program you can make calls to the system functions with little or no difference to how you would call any function in C++, since they are just function calls. You are the one responsible for allocating memory and cleaning it up (or rather you are via built in C++ memory management like 'new' and 'destroy' or any garbage collector you have associated to your project. The fact you are calling Linux system functions really doesn't matter. Just call them as you would any C-like function you might create.

I'd say write the code in whatever you were taught is good C++ coding style. You will have less to worry I think, than you think.

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