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I intended to write a shared buffer between a producer and a consumer thread. Here are my codes:

class PQueue
{
    Token token;
    boolean flag = false;   // false: add, true: poll

    PQueue()
    {
        token = null;
    }

    synchronized void add(Token token)
    {
        if(flag == true)
        {
            try {
                wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        flag = true;
        notify();
        this.token = token;
    }

    synchronized Token poll()
    {
        if(flag == false)
        {
            try {
                wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        flag = false;
        notify();
        return this.token;
    }
}

I am new to multithreading. Is there any potential concurrency bugs? Is this a "standard/common" way to achieve this goal? Or is there any much simpler and more efficient way?

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1  
Can't you just use java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue? –  vanza Aug 14 '12 at 5:24
    
notify() inside a synchronized block looks suspicious to me (but can't tell if that works or leads to deadlocks) –  Andreas_D Aug 14 '12 at 5:26
1  
@Andreas_D: you can't call notify() any other way, what do you mean suspicious? (His code is suspicious for other reasons, but not that one.) –  vanza Aug 14 '12 at 5:28
    
@vanza That is a good suggestion. In my case, I only need one-element buffer. Does the BlockingQueue have similar implementation? –  JackWM Aug 14 '12 at 5:28
    
@vanza - a guick tour on google reminded me that you're right. notify has to be called inside a synchronized block. –  Andreas_D Aug 14 '12 at 5:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Take a look at the java.util.concurrent package, in particular the BlockingQueue interface and the classes that implement it. These are meant for passing messages from one thread to another. The SynchronousQueue is exactly what you're trying to implement.

Your own implementation has a few flaws. For one, both the shared variables should be declared volatile to ensure that changes on one thread are seen by the other. And your if (flag == false) and if (flag == true) tests should actually be while loops, because wait() can wake up spuriously when notify() hasn't actually been called.

Rather than having a separate flag variable, I'd suggest just setting the token to null to indicate that there's no object. And rather than catching, printing, and blindly continuing in the face of InterruptedException, I'd recommend letting both methods just throw that exception if it happens. These are blocking methods, and it's the caller's responsibility to handle the possibility of a blocking method being interrupted.

Also, I don't know what your Token class is, but nothing in your queue actually depends on its type. It'd make more sense to define a generic PQueue<T>, and then use PQueue<Token> if you want to pass tokens.

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1. Try using the thread-safe classes and interfaces from java.util.concurrent Package.

2. Use the BlockingQueue Interface along with the ArrayBlockingQueue Class.

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