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In my code the following lines are currently the hotspot:

int table1[256] = /*...*/;
int table2[512] = /*...*/;
int table3[512] = /*...*/;

int* result = /*...*/;
for(int r = 0; r < r_end; ++r)
{
    std::uint64_t bits = bit_reader.value(); // 64 bits, no assumption regarding bits.

    // The get_ functions are table lookups from the highest word of the bits variable.

    struct entry
    {
        int sign_offset : 5;
        int r_offset    : 4;        
        int x           : 7;        
    };

    // NOTE: We are only interested in the highest word in the bits variable.

    entry e;
    if(is_in_table1(bits)) // branch prediction should work well here since table1 will be hit more often than 2 or 3, and 2 more often than 3.
        e = reinterpret_cast<const entry&>(table1[get_table1_index(bits)]);
    else if(is_in_table2(bits))
        e = reinterpret_cast<const entry&>(table2[get_table2_index(bits)]);
    else
        e = reinterpret_cast<const entry&>(table3[get_table3_index(bits)]);

    r                 += e.r_offset; // r is 18 bits, top 14 bits are always 0.
    int x              = e.x; // x is 14 bits, top 18 bits are always 0.        
    int sign_offset    = e.sign_offset;

    assert(sign_offset <= 16 && sign_offset > 0);

    // The following is the hotspot.

    int sign    = 1 - (bits >> (63 - sign_offset) & 0x2);
    (*result++) = ((x << 18) * sign) | r; // 32 bits

    // End of hotspot

    bit_reader.skip(sign_offset); // sign_offset is the last bit used.
}

Though I haven't figured out how to further optimize this, maybe something from intrinsics for Operations at Bit-Granularity, __shiftleft128 or _rot could be useful?

Note that I am also doing processing of the resulting data on the GPU, so the important thing is to get something into result which the GPU then can use to calculate the correct.

Suggestions?

EDIT:

Added table look-up.

EDIT:

            int sign = 1 - (bits >> (63 - e.sign_offset) & 0x2);
000000013FD6B893  and         ecx,1Fh  
000000013FD6B896  mov         eax,3Fh  
000000013FD6B89B  sub         eax,ecx  
000000013FD6B89D  movzx       ecx,al  
000000013FD6B8A0  shr         r8,cl  
000000013FD6B8A3  and         r8d,2  
000000013FD6B8A7  mov         r14d,1  
000000013FD6B8AD  sub         r14d,r8d  
share|improve this question
    
What's sign_offset? Is it - or can it be made - a compile time constant? –  Tony D Aug 14 '12 at 6:11
    
It is not a compile constant, it is looked up in a table depending on the bits before the sign bit in msb order. The sign_offset simply tells which bit (index) is the sign bit from the msb/left in bits. –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 6:15
    
So, can you store pre-calculated sign values directly in the table alongside the sign_offsets? Is sign_offset itself needed? Separately, it'd be reassuring to see the loops around this to check there's nothing constant across iterations. –  Tony D Aug 14 '12 at 6:53
1  
I made the observation, that the logical right shift is faster than the arithmetic right shift. I don't know if this is true for left shift operations, but you could try it by changing x to unsigned. –  Christian Ammer Aug 14 '12 at 7:43
1  
@ronag: I would still bet that the get_ functions are the slow down. The compiler is re-ordering the calls into the hotspot area. Three table lookups is probably much worse than a single lookup in a large table. Memory access is usually the slowest thing that can be done in a program, it can take anything from a few cycles to thousands of cycles depending on what memory is being read. –  Skizz Aug 14 '12 at 8:57

5 Answers 5

I overlooked the fact that the sign is +/-1, so I'm correcting my answer.

Assuming that mask is an array with properly defined bitmasks for all possible values of sign_offset, this approach might be faster

  bool sign = (bits & mask[sign_offset]) != 0;
  __int64 result = r;
  if (sign)
    result |= -(x << 18);
  else
    result |= x << 18;

The code generated by VC2010 optimized build

OP code (11 instructions)

; 23   :   __int64 sign = 1 - (bits >> (63 - sign_offset) & 0x2);

    mov rax, QWORD PTR bits$[rsp]
    mov ecx, 63                 ; 0000003fH
    sub cl, BYTE PTR sign_offset$[rsp]
    mov edx, 1
    sar rax, cl

; 24   :   __int64 result  = ((x << 18) * sign) | r; // 32 bits
; 25   :   std::cout << result;

    and eax, 2
    sub rdx, rax
    mov rax, QWORD PTR x$[rsp]
    shl rax, 18
    imul    rdx, rax
    or  rdx, QWORD PTR r$[rsp]

My code (8 instructions)

; 34   :   bool sign = (bits & mask[sign_offset]) != 0;

    mov r11, QWORD PTR sign_offset$[rsp]

; 35   :   __int64 result = r;
; 36   :   if (sign)
; 37   :     result |= -(x << 18);

    mov rdx, QWORD PTR x$[rsp]
    mov rax, QWORD PTR mask$[rsp+r11*8]
    shl rdx, 18
    test    rax, QWORD PTR bits$[rsp]
    je  SHORT $LN2@Test1
    neg rdx
$LN2@Test1:

; 38   :   else
; 39   :     result |= x << 18;

    or  rdx, QWORD PTR r$[rsp]

EDIT by Skizz

To get rid of branch:

shl rdx, 18
lea rbx,[rdx*2]
test rax, QWORD PTR bits$[rsp]
cmove rbx,0
sub rdx,rbx
or rdx, QWORD PTR r$[rsp]
share|improve this answer
    
@user946850: thank you for pointing that out –  Andrey Aug 14 '12 at 8:06
    
The je might count for 10 or 20 instructions due to branch misprediction... –  krlmlr Aug 14 '12 at 8:41
    
I can't say I like the branch, it doesn't look very predictable to me.. –  harold Aug 14 '12 at 8:42
    
@harold: Neither do I, but it's the shortest assembly code I could obtain so far... –  Andrey Aug 14 '12 at 8:43
    
Added edit to get rid of branch instruction. –  Skizz Aug 14 '12 at 10:15

Let's do some equivalent transformations:

int sign = 1 - (bits >> (63 - sign_offset) & 0x2);
int result  = ((x << 18) * sign) | r; // 32 bits

Perhaps the processor will find shifting 32-bit values cheaper -- replace the definition of HIDWORD with whatever leads to direct access to the high-order DWORD without shifting. Also, for preparation of the next step, let's rearrange the shifting in the second assignment:

#define HIDWORD(q) ((uint32_t)((q) >> 32))
int sign = 1 - (HIDWORD(bits) >> (31 - sign_offset) & 0x2);
int result  = ((x * sign) << 18) | r; // 32 bits

Observe that, in two-s complement, q * (-1) equals ~q + 1, or (q ^ -1) - (-1), while q * 1 equals (q ^ 0) - 0. This justifies the second transformation which gets rid of the nasty multiplication:

int mask = -(HIDWORD(bits) >> (32 - sign_offset) & 0x1);
int result  = (((x ^ mask) - mask) << 18) | r; // 32 bits

Now let's rearrange shifting again:

int mask = (-(HIDWORD(bits) >> (32 - sign_offset) & 0x1)) << 18;
int result  = (((x << 18) ^ mask) - mask) | r; // 32 bits

Recall the identity concerning - and ~:

int mask = (~(HIDWORD(bits) >> (32 - sign_offset) & 0x1) + 1) << 18;

Shift rearrangement again:

int mask = (~(HIDWORD(bits) >> (32 - sign_offset) & 0x1)) << 18 + (1 << 18);

Who can finally unfiddle this? (Are the transformations corect anyway?)

(Note that only profiling on a real CPU can assess the performance. Measures like instruction count won't do. I am not even sure that the transformations helped at all.)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, actually I think it might be possible to change ~bits, to just bits, and then let the GPU invert the sign of the value during the next processing stage. I will try this tonight. –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 7:48
    
The first transformation is just wrong, I thought it was & 0x1 but it is & 0x2. What happens with the result anyway if sign is -1? –  krlmlr Aug 14 '12 at 7:50
    
If sign is -1 then the sign bit in result is set and the complement of x is stored, i.e. negative x is stored into result. –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 7:59
    
I was wondering if the bitwise OR is still valid, but it seems like it is. –  krlmlr Aug 14 '12 at 8:02
    
I compiled it and got 13 instructions. The 2nd code snippet is also 13 instructions and has a small mistake –  Andrey Aug 14 '12 at 8:19

Memory access is usually the root of all optimisation problems on modern CPUs. You are being misled by the performance tools as to where the slow down is happening. The compiler is probably re-ordering the code to something like this:-

int sign    = 1 - (bits >> (63 - get_sign_offset(bits)) & 0x2);
(*result++) = ((get_x(bits) << 18) * sign) | (r += get_r_offset(bits));

or even:-

(*result++) = ((get_x(bits) << 18) * (1 - (bits >> (63 - get_sign_offset(bits)) & 0x2))) | (r += get_r_offset(bits));

This would highlight the lines you identified as being the hotspot.

I would look at the way you organise your memory and the what the various get_ functions do. Can you post the get_ functions at all?

share|improve this answer
    
I cannot post the code as is, but I can write a variant of it and post that, I will do this later. –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 9:11
    
Updated code with table lookup. –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 9:34
    
There is no re-ordering, due to the branches which you can now see. –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 10:22
    
@ronag: I wouldn't be so sure of that, compilers can do the most unexpected (and usually more optimal) operations on the code. The conditional part could still be reordered into the hotspot area, the only way to know for sure is to look at the assembly output - there's usually a compiler option to write the assembly version to file, otherwise the debugger may be able to find the code. –  Skizz Aug 14 '12 at 10:26
    
I used the debugger and updated my post with the release assembly generated. –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 10:37

To calculate the sign, I would suggest this:

int sign = (int)(((int64_t)(bits << sign_offset)) >> 63);

Which is only 2 instructions (shl and sar).

If sign_offset is one bigger than I expected:

int sign = (int)(((int64_t)(bits << (sign_offset - 1))) >> 63);

Which is still not bad. Should be only 3 instructions.

That gives an answer as 0 or -1, with which you can do this:

(*result++) = (((x << 18) ^ sign) - sign) | r;
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work, since the sign will be shifted out, should be bits << (sign_offset-1). –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 8:55
    
It would be shifted out? What exactly does get_sign_offset return then, not the number of leading zero's? –  harold Aug 14 '12 at 9:00
    
sign_bit_index = (63 - sign_offset). –  ronag Aug 14 '12 at 9:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think this is the fastest solution:

*result++ = (_rotl64(bits, sign_offset) << 31) | (x << 18) | (r << 0); // 32 bits

And then correct x depending on whether the sign bit is set or not on the GPU.

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