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I can't run this block in PostgreSQL 8.2.

DECLARE
        curtime char;
BEGIN
        curtime := 'now';
        INSERT INTO logtable VALUES (logtxt, curtime);
        RETURN curtime;
END;

When I try it shows the error:

ERROR: syntax error at or near "char"
SQL state: 42601
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1 Answer 1

It sounds like you're trying to run a PL/PgSQL code block stand-alone, without wrapping it up in a function using CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION. That won't work, you need to include it in a function or (from PostgreSQL 9.0) a DO block. PL/PgSQL and plain SQL are different languages so you can't just run PL/PgSQL code directly.

It'd help if you explained why you're trying to write the code you pasted. I suspect you're trying to solve a problem that's better handled with a trigger function like an audit trigger.

Some important notes:

You need to update PostgreSQL: PostgreSQL 8.2 is dangerously out of date and unsupported. security and bug fixes are no longer being released. Upgrade urgently to a supported version, but make sure to read the release notes for each major ".0" version like "8.3.0", "8.4.0", etc for migration and compatibility advice.

Avoid 'now': Also, instead of using 'now' you should usually use the current date/time functions, particularly current_timestamp.

current_timestamp is stable: The hoop-jumping you are doing is probably unnecessary because the value of current_timestamp (and 'now'::timestamp) doesn't change for the duration of a transaction. Eg:

regress=# BEGIN;
regress=# SELECT current_timestamp;
 2012-08-14 14:52:43.382596+08
regress=# SELECT pg_sleep(5);
regress=# SELECT current_timestamp;
 2012-08-14 14:52:43.382596+08

Details

Your intention appears to be something like the following (incorrect, do not use) code:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION some_function(logtxt text) RETURNS timestamptz AS $$
DECLARE
        curtime char;
BEGIN
        curtime := 'now';
        INSERT INTO logtable VALUES (logtxt, curtime);
        RETURN curtime;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE 'plpgsql';

but you've misused the char datatype, which requires a length parameter. It defaults to 1 if not supplied so you'll get:

regress=# SELECT some_function();
ERROR:  value too long for type character(1)
CONTEXT:  PL/pgSQL function "some_function" line 5 at assignment

NEVER use the char datatype in SQL; use varchar or text. For cross-database portability varchar(n) where n is a maximum length is required; if portability isn't needed use text.

If you change char to text in the above, your code might run, but it still doesn't make any sense. I strongly suspect that you really want to write:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION some_function(logtxt text) RETURNS timestamptz AS $$
BEGIN
        INSERT INTO logtable VALUES (logtxt, current_timestamp);
        RETURN current_timestamp;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE 'plpgsql';

... but you didn't know about the current date/time functions.

Even that's too much, really. I think you're trying to solve a problem that's a better fit for a trigger.

share|improve this answer
    
thank u very much for ur quick reply... –  Jils2947 Aug 14 '12 at 6:42
    
@Jils2947 No worries. I've expanded the explanation considerably and added some links. Hope it helps. If not, please explain what you're trying to achieve with the code you posted - what problem you are trying to solve with it. –  Craig Ringer Aug 14 '12 at 6:59

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