Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to ensure I follow best practices in the context of ASP .NET MVC 3. I am using the Razor template engine to generate automated e-mails when certain actions are performed on an MVC 3 web application.

I have created a separate class library for the e-mailer and this class library will contain the models that will be used when generating the emails as well as a message factory which will generate the necessary message text using the appropriate view and model.

I am unsure as to where I should be storing my view templates. I would like to store them as CSHTML, as this will allow the developers on the project (who are new to Razor) to use IntelliSense while creating the mail templates.

I don't think I can store them in a folder in the class library as this will make deployment more complicated. If I store them in a folder within the MVC 3 Web Application root, they will be accessible to anyone on the internet with knowledge of the correct path. I now consider two options:

  1. Store them in the app_data folder, but this seems untidy.

  2. Store them in a folder called "EmailTemplates" within the Views folder in MVC. I think this is the best option as you can not browse to it directly (no controller) and our developers can access them easily and make use of IntelliSense.

Is option 2 the best option, would it be a sin to have these mail templates located here? I would then access the files directly through the local filesystem but I am not sure if I will have security issues once deployed to production (perhaps using the app_data folder would prevent this). I would like minimal configuration for deployment.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

As usual, there's no one right answer, its all about philosophy and approach, but most important (in my mind) - utility. I.E. if it works, easy to maintain, understandable - why not do it?

I would, in your shoes, put it under App_Data folder - this is by definition where all data that application uses goes. Database is there, configuration XMLs are there etc. So why not use that folder for your purpose.

You can easily access it like this from within your C# code: System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath(@"~/App_Data"). I don't think any other (created by yourself) folder will be any better or worse ... its just App_Data is there specifically for these purposes, but it doesn't mean you cannot do something else, that makes sense in your application.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, was going back and forth as to whether to use your suggestion or place it in views. It appears IntelliSense does not work when I place the templates within App_Data. So I've decided to place it within Views instead. Thanks for your feedback though! –  King_Nothing Aug 16 '12 at 6:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After doing more research and some experimenting, the Views folder seems to be the best place for my email templates. Here's my reasoning:

  • The email templates will only be used by the web application and nothing else.

  • The application pool the MVC application will run under, will at the very least have access to read the folders within the Views folder. This means I don't need to cater for any special permissions for folders during deployment. (Although this is true of the App_Data folder as well).

  • IntelliSense does not work from within the App_Data folder but does work within the Views folder. As the developers on this project are new to Razor, IntelliSense will make things easier for them. Also just makes development of the templates easier.

  • Although I created a separate project for the template mailer, one can store the models for the mail templates with your MVC models as well.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.